Software Engineering Institute | Carnegie Mellon University

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Insider Threat Blog

Real-World Work Combating Insider Threats

Individual organizations spend millions per year complying with information security mandates, which tend to be either too general or too specific. However, organizations focusing solely on compliance miss the opportunity to strengthen their information security culture. This blog post will explain the benefits of information security culture and demonstrate how compliance with information security mandates may prevent organizations from achieving their full information security culture potential.

Hello, I am Randy Trzeciak, Director of the CERT National Insider Threat Center (NITC). I would like to welcome you to the NITC blog series on insider threat incidents within various sectors. In this first post, I (1) describe the purpose of the series and highlight what you can expect to see during the series, and (2) review the NITC insider threat corpus, which is the foundation for our empirical research and analysis. Join us over this nine-part series as we explore in-depth specific issues pertaining to insider threat. We hope you will follow along, and we encourage you to provide feedback about other sectors that we should analyze.

The costs of the steady stream of data breaches and attacks on sensitive and confidential data continue to rise. Organizations are responding by making data protection a critical component of their leadership and governance strategies. The European Union's recent General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) adds layers of complexity to protecting the data of individuals in the EU and European Economic Area. Organizations are struggling to understand GDPR's requirements, much less become compliant. In this series of blog posts, I'll describe how to use the CERT Resilience Management Model (CERT-RMM) to approach GDPR compliance and, more fundamentally, data privacy.

In the first post in this two-part series, we covered five unique challenges that impact insider threat programs and hub analysts. The challenges included lack of adequate training, competing interests, acquiring data, analyzing data, and handling false positives.

As you read the new challenges introduced in this post, ask yourself the same questions: 1) How many of these challenges are ones you are facing today? 2) Are there challenges in this list that lead to an "aha" moment? 3) Are there challenges you are facing that did not make the list? 4) Do you need assistance with combating any of these challenges? Let us know your answers and thoughts via email at insider-threat-feedback@cert.org.

This post was also authored by Andrew Hoover.

In Cybersecurity Architecture, Part 1: Cyber Resilience and Critical Service, we talked about the importance of identifying and prioritizing critical or high-value services and the assets and data that support them. In this post, we'll introduce our approach for reviewing the security of the architecture of information systems that deliver or support these services. We'll also describe our review's first areas of focus: System Boundary and Boundary Protection.

The purpose of this two-part blog series is to discuss five challenges that often plague insider threat programs and more specifically the analysts that are working in insider threat hubs. I am in a unique position to discuss this area because I have many years of experience working directly with operational insider threat programs of varying maturity levels. Thus I have a front-row vantage point to understand the challenges that analysts face on a daily basis. In this blog post, I will discuss some of the key challenges and associated recommendations (e.g., quick wins) facing many organizations.

The National Institute for Science and Technology (NIST) recently released version 1.1 of its Cybersecurity Framework (CSF). Organizations around the world--including the federal civilian government, by mandate--use the CSF to guide key cybersecurity activities. However, the framework's 108 subcategories can feel daunting. This blog post describes the Software Engineering Institute's recent efforts to group the 108 subcategories into 15 clusters of related activities, making the CSF more approachable for typical organizations. The post also gives example scenarios of how organizations might use the CSF Activity Clusters to facilitate more effective cybersecurity decision making.

In this blog series, I review topics related to deploying a text analytics capability for insider threat mitigation. In this segment, I continue the conversation by disambiguating terminology related to text analysis, summarizing methodological approaches for developing text analytics tools, and justifying how this capability can supplement an existing capability to monitor insider threat risk. In my next post, Acquiring or Deploying a Text Analytics Solution, I will discuss how organizations can think through the process of procuring or developing a custom in-house text analytics solution.