Category: Strategic Planning

When the rate of change inside an institution becomes slower than the rate of change outside, the end is in sight. - Jack Welch

In a world of agile everything, agile concepts are being applied in areas well beyond software development. At the NDIA Agile in Government Summit held in Washington, D.C. in June, Dr. George Duchak, the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Cyber, Command & Control, Communications & Networks, and Business Systems, spoke about the importance of agility to organizational success in a volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous world. Dr. Duchak told the crowd that agile software development can't stand alone, but must be woven into the fabric of an organization and become a part of the way an organization's people, processes, systems and data interact to deliver value. The business architecture must be constructed for agility.

I first wrote about agile strategic planning in my March 2012 blog post, Toward Agile Strategic Planning. In this post, I want to expand that discussion to look closer at agile strategy, or short-cycle strategy development and execution, describe what it looks like when implemented, and examine how it supports organizational performance.

Organizational improvement efforts should be driven by business needs, not by the content of improvement models. While improvement models, such as the Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) or the Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence, provide excellent guidance and best practice standards, the way in which those models are implemented must be guided by the same drivers that influence any other business decision. Business drivers are the collection of people, information, and conditions that initiate and support activities that help an organization accomplish its mission.

Strategic planning is a process for defining an organization's approach for achieving its mission. Conducting successful strategic planning is essential because it creates a foundation for executing work, as well as setting the stage for enterprise architecture, process improvement, risk management, portfolio management, and any other enterprise-wide initiatives. Government organizations are operating in an environment of almost near-constant change, however, which makes it hard to conduct strategic planning efforts successfully. Moreover, when organizations do tackle strategy, they often get bogged down reflecting on the past or speculating on an uncertain future. This posting describes recent work investigating and integrating techniques to improve organizational strategic planning.