Category: Software Assurance

The exponential increase in cybercrime is a perfect example of how rapidly change is happening in cyberspace and why operational security is a critical need. In the 1990s, computer crime was usually nothing more than simple trespass. Twenty-five years later, computer crime has become a vast criminal enterprise with profits estimated at $1 trillion annually. One of the primary contributors to this astonishing success is the vulnerability of software to exploitation through defects. How pervasive is the problem of vulnerability? The average cost of a data breach is $4 million, up 29 percent since 2013, according to Ponemon Institute and IBM data. Ponemon also concluded that there's a 26-percent probability that an enterprise will be hit by one or more data breaches of 10,000 records over the next 2 years. Increased system complexity, pervasive interconnectivity, and widely distributed access have increased the challenges for building and acquiring operationally secure capabilities. This blog post introduces a set of seven principles that address the challenges of acquiring, building, deploying, and sustaining software systems to achieve a desired level of confidence for software assurance.

This post was co-authored by Sagar Chaki

In 2011, the U.S. Government maintained a fleet of approximately 8,000 unmanned aerial systems (UAS), commonly referred to as "drones," a number that continues to grow. "No weapon system has had a more profound impact on the United States' ability to provide persistence on the battlefield than the UAVs," according to a report from the 2012 Defense Science Board. Making sure government and privately owned drones share international air space safely and effectively is a top priority for government officials. Distributed Adaptive Real-Time (DART) systems are key to many areas of Department of Defense (DoD) capability, including the safe execution of autonomous, multi-UAS missions having civilian benefits. DART systems promise to revolutionize several such areas of mutual civilian-DoD interest, such as robotics, transportation, energy, and health care. To fully realize the potential of DART systems, however, the software controlling them must be engineered for high-assurance and certified to operate safely and effectively. In short, these systems must satisfy guaranteed and highly-critical safety requirements (e.g., collision avoidance) while adapting smartly to achieve application requirements, such as protection coverage, while operating in dynamic and uncertain environments. This blog post describes our architecture and approach to engineering high-assurance software for DART systems.

The (ISC)2 Global Information Security Workforce Study (GISWS) forecasts a shortfall of 1.5 million cybersecurity professionals by 2020. Government sources also project critical shortages of cybersecurity professionals. This predicted shortfall is troubling because the growing number and sophistication of cyber attacks threatens our infrastructure, which is increasingly software dependent. This blog post--derived from the paper Meeting Industry Needs for Secure Software Development, which I coauthored with Girish Seshagiri and Julie Howar--describes a collaboration involving industry, government, and academia to address this shortfall by developing a two-year degree program at a community college in secure software development.

This blog post was co-authored by Nancy Mead, SEI Fellow.

To ensure software will function as intended and is free of vulnerabilities (aka software assurance), software engineers must consider security early in the lifecycle, when the system is being designed and architected. Recent research on vulnerabilities supports this claim: Nearly half the weaknesses identified in the Common Weakness Enumeration (CWE) repository have been identified as design weaknesses. These weaknesses are introduced early in the lifecycle and cannot be patched away in later phases. They result from poor (or incomplete) security requirements, system designs, and architecture choices for which security has not been given appropriate priority. Effective use of metrics and methods that apply systematic consideration for security risk can highlight gaps earlier in the lifecycle before the impact is felt and when the cost of addressing these gaps is less. This blog post explores the connection between measurement, methods for software assurance, and security. Specifically, we focus on three early lifecycle methods that have shown promise: the Software Assurance Framework (SAF), Security Quality Requirements Engineering (SQUARE) Methodology, and Security Engineering Risk Analysis (SERA) Framework.

The federal government is facing a shortage of cybersecurity professionals that puts our national security at risk, according to recent research. "As cyber attacks have increased and there is increased awareness of vulnerabilities, there is more demand for the professionals who can stop such attacks. But educating, recruiting, training and hiring these cybersecurity professionals takes time," the research states. Recognizing these realities, the U. S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) National Cyber Security Division (NCSD) enlisted the resources of the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) to develop a curriculum for a Master of Software Assurance degree program and define transition strategies for implementing it. This blog post presents an overview of the Master of Software Assurance curriculum project, including its history, student prerequisites and outcomes, a core body of knowledge, and a curriculum architecture from which to create such a degree program.

Software is a growing component of systems used by Department of Defense (DoD), government, and industry organizations. As organizations become more dependent on software, security-related risks to their organizational missions are also increasing. Despite this rise in security risk exposure, most organizations follow a familiar pattern when managing those risks.

This post was co-authored by Bill Nichols.


Mitre's Top 25 Most Dangerous Software Errors is a list that details quality problems, as well as security problems. This list aims to help software developers "prevent the kinds of vulnerabilities that plague the software industry, by identifying and avoiding all-too-common mistakes that occur before software is even shipped." These vulnerabilities often result in software that does not function as intended, presenting an opportunity for attackers to compromise a system.

As part of an ongoing effort to keep you informed about our latest work, I would like to let you know about some recently published SEI technical reports and notes. These reports highlight the latest work of SEI technologists in resilience, metrics, sustainment, and software assurance. This post includes a listing of each report, author(s), and links where the published reports can be accessed on the SEI website.

As part of an ongoing effort to keep you informed about our latest work, I would like to let you know about some recently published SEI technical reports and notes. These reports highlight the latest work of SEI technologists in software assurance, social networking tools, insider threat, and the Security Engineering Risk Analysis Framework (SERA). This post includes a listing of each report, author(s), and links where the published reports can be accessed on the SEI website.

In 2012, the White House released its federal digital strategy. What's noteworthy about this release is that the executive office distributed the strategy using Bootstrap, an open source software (OSS) tool developed by Twitter and made freely available to the public via the code hosting site GitHub. This is not the only evidence that we have seen of increased government interest in OSS adoption. Indeed, the 2013 report The Future of Open Source Software revealed that 34 percent of its respondents were government entities using OSS products.

Software is the principal, enabling means for delivering system and warfighter performance across a spectrum of Department of Defense (DoD) capabilities. These capabilities span the spectrum of mission-essential business systems to mission-critical command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (C4ISR) systems to complex weapon systems. Many of these systems now operate interdependently in a complex net-centric and cyber environment. The pace of technological change continues to evolve along with the almost total system reliance on software. This blog posting examines the various challenges that the DoD faces in implementing software assurance and suggests strategies for an enterprise-wide approach.

As part of an ongoing effort to keep you informed about our latest work, I'd like to let you know about some recently published SEI technical reports and notes. These reports highlight the latest work of SEI technologists in information assurance and agile, the Team Software Process (TSP), CERT secure coding standards, resource allocation, fuzzing, cloud computing interoperability, and cloud computing at the tactical edge. This post includes a listing of each report, author(s), and links where the published reports can be accessed on the SEI website.

Department of Defense (DoD) programs have traditionally focused on the software acquisition phase (initial procurement, development, production, and deployment) and largely discounted the software sustainment phase (operations and support) until late in the lifecycle. The costs of software sustainment are becoming too high to discount since they account for 60 to 90 percent of the total software lifecycle effort.