Category: Service-Oriented Architecture

In 2009, a popular blogger published a post entitled "SOA is Dead," which generated extensive commentary among those who work in the field of service-oriented architecture (SOA). Many practitioners in this field completely misinterpreted the post; some read the title and just assumed that the content referenced the demise of SOA. Quite the opposite, the post was inviting people to stop thinking about SOA as a set of technologies and start embracing SOA as an approach for designing, developing, and managing distributed systems that goes beyond just the technology. Unfortunately, even though SOA is still alive and widely adopted, a belief still persists that SOA can be purchased off the shelf. This post highlights recent research aimed at clarifying this misperception for architects, as well as identifying the elements that constitute a service-oriented system and the relationships between these elements.

As part of an ongoing effort to keep you informed about our latest work, I'd like to let you know about some recently published SEI technical reports and notes. These reports highlight the latest work of SEI technologists in insider threat, interoperability, service-oriented architecture, operational resilience, and automated remediation. This post includes a listing of each report, author(s), and links where the published reports can be accessed on the SEI website.

Testing plays a critical role in the development of software-reliant systems. Even with the most diligent efforts of requirements engineers, designers, and programmers, faults inevitably occur. These faults are most commonly discovered and removed by testing the system and comparing what it does to what it is supposed to do. This blog posting summarizes a method that improves testing outcomes (including efficacy and cost) in a software-reliant system by using an architectural design approach, which describes a coherent set of architectural decisions taken by architects to help meet the behavioral and quality attribute requirements of systems being developed.