Category: Security-Related Requirements

Almost all software systems today face a variety of threats, and the number of threats grows as technology changes. Malware that exploits software vulnerabilities grew 151 percent in the second quarter of 2018, and cyber-crime damage costs are estimated to reach $6 trillion annually by 2021. Threats can come from outside or within organizations, and they can have devastating consequences. Attacks can disable systems entirely or lead to the leaking of sensitive information, which would diminish consumer trust in the system provider. To prevent threats from taking advantage of system flaws, administrators can use threat-modeling methods to inform defensive measures. In this blog post, I summarize 12 available threat-modeling methods.

In the first post in this series, I presented 10 types of application security testing (AST) tools and discussed when and how to use them. In this post, I will delve into the decision-making factors to consider when selecting an AST tool and present guidance in the form of lists that can easily be referenced as checklists by those responsible for application security testing.

IPv6 deployment is on the rise. Google reported that as of July 14 2018, 23.94 percent of users accessed its site via IPv6, up 6.16 percent from that same date in 2017. Drafted in 1998 and an Internet Standard as of July 2017, Internet Protocol 6 (IPv6) is intended to replace IPv4 in assigning devices on the internet a unique identity. Plans for IPv6 got underway after it was realized that IPv4's cap of 4.3 billion addresses would not be sufficient to cover the number of devices accessing the internet. This blog post is the first in a series aimed at encouraging IPv6 adoption, whether at the enterprise-wide level, the organizational level, or the individual, home-user level.

Bugs and weaknesses in software are common: 84 percent of software breaches exploit vulnerabilities at the application layer. The prevalence of software-related problems is a key motivation for using application security testing (AST) tools. With a growing number of application security testing tools available, it can be confusing for information technology (IT) leaders, developers, and engineers to know which tools address which issues. This blog post, the first in a series on application security testing tools, will help to navigate the sea of offerings by categorizing the different types of AST tools available and providing guidance on how and when to use each class of tool.

See the second post in this series, Decision-Making Factors for Selecting Application Security Testing Tools.

In our work with acquisition programs, we've often observed a major problem: requirements specifications that are incomplete, with many functional requirements missing. Whereas requirements specifications typically specify normal system behavior, they are often woefully incomplete when it comes to off-nominal behavior, which deals with abnormal events and situations the system must detect and how the system must react when it detects that these events have occurred or situations exist. Thus, although requirements typically specify how the system must behave under normal conditions, they often do not adequately specify how the system must behave if it cannot or should not behave as normally expected. This blog post examines requirements engineering for off-nominal behavior.

Background: In our research and acquisition work on commercial and Department of Defense (DoD) programs, ranging from relatively simple two-tier data-processing applications to large-scale multi-tier weapons systems, one of the primary problems that we see repeatedly is that acquisitionand development organizations encounter the following three obstacles concerning safety- and security-related requirements: