Category: Insider Threat

Insider threat continues to be a problem with approximately 50 percent of organizations experiencing at least one malicious insider incident per year, according to the 2017 U.S. State of Cybercrime Survey. Although the attack methods vary depending on the industry, the primary types of attacks identified by researchers at the CERT Insider Threat Center--theft of intellectual property, sabotage, fraud, and espionage--continue to hold true. In our work with public and private industry, we continue to see that insider threats are influenced by a combination of technical, behavioral, and organizational issues. To address these threats, we have published the fifth edition of the Common Sense Guide to Mitigating Insider Threats, which highlights policies, procedures, and technologies to mitigate insider threats in all areas of the organization. In this blog post, excerpted from the latest edition of the guide, I highlight five best practices that are important first steps for an organization interested in establishing a program to implement to protect and detect insider threats.

As organizations' critical assets have become digitized and access to information has increased, the nature and severity of threats has changed. Organizations' own personnel--insiders--now have greater ability than ever before to misuse their access to critical organizational assets. Insiders know where critical assets are, what is important, and what is valuable. Their organizations have given them authorized access to these assets and the means to compromise the confidentiality, availability, or integrity of data. As organizations rely on cyber systems to support critical missions, a malicious insider who is trying to harm an organization can do so through, for example, sabotaging a critical IT system or stealing intellectual property to benefit a new employer or a competitor. Government and industry organizations are responding to this change in the threat landscape and are increasingly aware of the escalating risks. CERT has been a widely acknowledged leader in insider threat since it began investigating the problem in 2001. The CERT Guide to Insider Threat was inducted in 2016 into the Palo Alto Networks Cybersecurity Canon, illustrating its value in helping organizations understand the risks that their own employees pose to critical assets. This blog post describes the challenge of insider threats, approaches to detection, and how machine learning-enabled software helps provide protection against this risk.

In the 2016 Cyber Security Intelligence Index, IBM found that 60 percent of all cyber attacks were carried out by insiders. One reason that insider threat remains so problematic is that organizations typically respond to these threats with negative technical incentives, such as practices that monitor employee behavior, detect and punish misbehavior, and otherwise try to force employees to act in the best interest of the organization. In contrast, this blog post highlights results from our recent research that suggests organizations need to take a more holistic approach to mitigating insider threat: one that incorporates human involvement. In particular, positive incentives can produce better balance and security for organizations by complementing traditional practices to insider threat programs. This post also presents three practices to increase positive incentives that organizations can use to reduce insider threat.

A 2016 study on cybersecurity and digital trust found that 69 percent of organizations surveyed experienced an attempted or successful theft or corruption of data by insiders in the last 12 months. Despite the impact of insider threat--and continued mandates that government agencies and their contractors put insider threat programs in place--a number of organizations still have not implemented them. Moreover, the programs that have been implemented often have serious deficiencies. One impediment to organizations establishing an insider threat program is the lack of a clear business case for implementing available countermeasures.

For two consecutive years, organizations reported that insider crimes caused comparable damage (34 percent) to external attacks (31 percent), according to a recent cybercrime report co-sponsored by the CERT Division at the Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute. Despite this near parity, media reports of attacks often focus on external attacks and their aftermath, yet an attack can be equally or even more devastating when carried out from within an organization. Insider threats are influenced by a combination of technical, behavioral, and organizational issues and must be addressed by policies, procedures, and technologies. Researchers at the CERT Insider Threat Center define insider threat as actions by an individual who meets the following criteria:

As part of an ongoing effort to keep you informed about our latest work, I would like to let you know about some recently published SEI technical reports and notes. These reports highlight the latest work of SEI technologists in software assurance, social networking tools, insider threat, and the Security Engineering Risk Analysis Framework (SERA). This post includes a listing of each report, author(s), and links where the published reports can be accessed on the SEI website.

Insider threat is the threat to organization's critical assets posed by trusted individuals - including employees, contractors, and business partners - authorized to use the organization's information technology systems. Insider threat programs within an organization help to manage the risks due to these threats through specific prevention, detection, and response practices and technologies. The National Industrial Security Program Operating Manual (NISPOM), which provides baseline standards for the protection of classified information, is considering proposed changes that would require contractors that engage with federal agencies, which process or access classified information, to establish insider threat programs.

As part of an ongoing effort to keep you informed about our latest work, I would like to let you know about some recently published SEI technical reports and notes. These reports highlight the latest work of SEI technologists in assuring software reliability, future architectures, Agile software teams, insider threat, and HTML5. This post includes a listing of each report, author(s), and links where the published reports can be accessed on the SEI website.

Social engineering involves the manipulation of individuals to get them to unwittingly perform actions that cause harm or increase the probability of causing future harm, which we call "unintentional insider threat." This blog post highlights recent research that aims to add to the body of knowledge about the factors that lead to unintentional insider threat (UIT) and about how organizations in industry and government can protect themselves.

As part of an ongoing effort to keep you informed about our latest work, I would like to let you know about some recently published SEI technical reports and notes. These reports highlight the latest work of SEI technologists in systems of systems integration from an architectural perspective, unintentional insider threat that derives from social engineering, identifying physical security gaps in international mail processing centers and similar facilities, countermeasures used by cloud service providers, the Team Software Process (TSP), and key automation and analysis techniques. This post includes a listing of each report, author(s), and links where the published reports can be accessed on the SEI website.

As part of our mission to advance the practice of software engineering and cybersecurity through research and technology transition, our work focuses on ensuring that software-reliant systems are developed and operated with predictable and improved quality, schedule, and cost. To achieve this mission, the SEI conducts research and development activities involving the Department of Defense (DoD), federal agencies, industry, and academia. As we look back on 2013, this blog posting highlights our many R&D accomplishments during the past year.

As part of an ongoing effort to keep you informed about our latest work, I would like to let you know about some recently published SEI technical reports and notes. Three of these reports highlight the latest work of SEI technologists on insider threat in international contexts, unintentional insider threats, and attributes and mitigation strategies. The last reportprovides the results of several exploratory research initiatives conducted by SEI staff in fiscal year 2012. This post includes a listing of each report, author(s), and links where the published reports can be accessed on the SEI website.

Researchers on the CERT Division's insider threat team have presented several of the 26 patterns identified by analyzing our insider threat database, which is based on examinations of more than 700 insider threat cases and interviews with the United States Secret Service, victims' organizations, and convicted felons. Through our analysis, we identified more than 100 categories of weaknesses in systems, processes, people, or technologies that allowed insider threats to occur. One aspect of our research focuses on identifying enterprise architecture patterns that organizations can use to protect their systems from malicious insider threat. Now that we've developed 26 patterns, our next priority is to assemble these patterns into a pattern language that organizations can use to bolster their resources and make them more resilient against insider threats. This blog post is the third installment in a seriesthat describes our research to create and validate an insider threat mitigation pattern language to help organizations balance the cost of security controls with the risk of insider compromise.

As part of an ongoing effort to keep you informed about our latest work, I would like to let you know about some recently published SEI technical reports and notes. These reports highlight the latest work of SEI technologists in quantifying expert judgment, insider threat, detecting and preventing data exfiltration, and developing a common vocabulary for malware analysts. This post includes a listing of each report, author(s), and links where the published reports can be accessed on the SEI website.

As part of an ongoing effort to keep you informed about our latest work, I'd like to let you know about some recently published SEI technical reports and notes. These reports highlight the latest work of SEI technologists in and systems engineering, resilience, and insider threat. This post includes a listing of each report, author(s), and links where the published reports can be accessed on the SEI website.

Sabotage of IT systems by employees (the so-called "inside threat") is a serious problem facing many companies today. Not only can data or computing systems be damaged, but outward-facing systems can be compromised to such an extent that customers cannot access an organization's resources or products. Previous blog postings on the topic of insider threat have discussed mitigation patterns, controls that help identify insiders at risk of committing cyber crime, and the protection of next-generation DoD enterprise systems against insider threats through the capture, validation, and application of enterprise architectural patterns. This blog post describes our latest research in determining the indicators that insiders might demonstrate prior to attacks.

Since 2001, researchers at the CERT Insider Threat Center have documented malicious insider activity by examining media reports and court transcripts and conducting interviews with the United States Secret Service, victims' organizations, and convicted felons. Among the more than 700 insider threat cases that we've documented, our analysis has identified more than 100 categories of weaknesses in systems, processes, people or technologies that allowed insider threats to occur. One aspect of our research has focused on identifying enterprise architecture patterns that protect organization systems from malicious insider threat.

According to the 2011 CyberSecurity Watch Survey, approximately 21 percent of cyber crimes against organizations are committed by insiders. Of the 607 organizations participating in the survey, 46 percent stated that the damage caused by insiders was more significant than the damage caused by outsiders. Over the past 11 years, researchers at the CERT Insider Threat Center have documented incidents related to malicious insider activity. Their sources include media reports, the courts, the United States Secret Service, victim organizations, and interviews with convicted felons.

According to the 2011 CyberSecurity Watch Survey, approximately 21 percent of cyber crimes against organizations are committed by insiders. Of the 607 organizations participating in the survey, 46 percent stated that the damage caused by insiders was more significant than the damage caused by outsiders. Over the past 11 years, CERT Insider Threat researchers have collected incidents related to malicious activity by insiders obtained from a number of sources, including media reports, the courts, the United States Secret Service, victim organizations, and interviews with convicted felons.

We use the SEI Blog to inform you about the latest work at the SEI, so this week I'm summarizing some video presentations recently posted to the SEI website from the SEI Technologies Forum. This virtual event held in late 2011 brought together participants from more than 50 countries to engage with SEI researchers on a sample of our latest work, including cloud computing, insider threat, Agile development, software architecture, security, measurement, process improvement, and acquisition dynamics. This post includes a description of all the video presentations from the first event, along with links where you can view the full presentations on the SEI website.

As part of an ongoing effort to keep you informed about our latest work, I'd like to let you know about some recently published SEI technical reports and notes. These reports highlight the latest work of SEI technologists in insider threat, interoperability, service-oriented architecture, operational resilience, and automated remediation. This post includes a listing of each report, author(s), and links where the published reports can be accessed on the SEI website.

As part of an ongoing effort to keep you informed about our latest work, I'd like to let you know about some recently published SEI technical reports and notes. These reports highlight the latest work of SEI technologists in Agile methods, insider threat,the SMART Grid Maturity Model, acquisition, and CMMI. This post includes a listing of each report, author/s, and links where the published reports can be accessed on the SEI website.

The 2011 CyberSecurity Watch survey revealed that 27 percent of cybersecurity attacks against organizations were caused by disgruntled, greedy, or subversive insiders, employees, or contractors with access to that organization's network systems or data. Of the 607 survey respondents, 43 percent view insider threat attacks as more costly and cited not only a financial loss but also damage to reputation, critical system disruption, and loss of confidential or proprietary information. For the Department of Defense (DoD) and industry, combating insider threat attacks is hard due to the authorized physical and logical access of insiders to organization systems and intimate knowledge of organizations themselves.

Happy Independence Day from all of us here at the SEI. I'd like to take advantage of this special occasion to keep you apprised of a new technical report from the SEI. It's part of an ongoing effort to keep you informed about the latest work of SEI technologists. This report highlights the latest work of SEI technologists in the fields of insider threat. This post includes a listing of the report, authors, and links where the published reports can be accessed on the SEI website.