Category: Insider Threat Patterns

As part of an ongoing effort to keep you informed about our latest work, I would like to let you know about some recently published SEI technical reports and notes. These reports highlight the latest work of SEI technologists in software assurance, social networking tools, insider threat, and the Security Engineering Risk Analysis Framework (SERA). This post includes a listing of each report, author(s), and links where the published reports can be accessed on the SEI website.

Researchers on the CERT Division's insider threat team have presented several of the 26 patterns identified by analyzing our insider threat database, which is based on examinations of more than 700 insider threat cases and interviews with the United States Secret Service, victims' organizations, and convicted felons. Through our analysis, we identified more than 100 categories of weaknesses in systems, processes, people, or technologies that allowed insider threats to occur. One aspect of our research focuses on identifying enterprise architecture patterns that organizations can use to protect their systems from malicious insider threat. Now that we've developed 26 patterns, our next priority is to assemble these patterns into a pattern language that organizations can use to bolster their resources and make them more resilient against insider threats. This blog post is the third installment in a seriesthat describes our research to create and validate an insider threat mitigation pattern language to help organizations balance the cost of security controls with the risk of insider compromise.

Since 2001, researchers at the CERT Insider Threat Center have documented malicious insider activity by examining media reports and court transcripts and conducting interviews with the United States Secret Service, victims' organizations, and convicted felons. Among the more than 700 insider threat cases that we've documented, our analysis has identified more than 100 categories of weaknesses in systems, processes, people or technologies that allowed insider threats to occur. One aspect of our research has focused on identifying enterprise architecture patterns that protect organization systems from malicious insider threat.