Category: Cyber Risk

As part of an ongoing effort to keep you informed about our latest work, this blog post summarizes some recently published books, SEI technical reports, and webinars in cybersecurity engineering, performance and dependability, cyber risk and resilience management, cyber intelligence, secure coding, and the latest requirements for chief information security offficers (CISOs).

These publications highlight the latest work of SEI technologists in these areas. This post includes a listing of each publication, author(s), and links where they can be accessed on the SEI website.

Malicious attackers and penetration testers can use some of the same tools. Attackers use them to cause harm while penetration testers use them to bring value to organizations. In this blog post, I've partnered with colleagues Jason Frank and Will Schroeder from The Veris Group's Adaptive Threat Division to describe some of the common penetration testing tools and techniques that can greatly benefit network defenders. While this blog post cannot cover all the techniques and shortcuts we use in the field, we do describe a set of 10 tactics that provide very little network disruption, are easy to use, and freely available.

As part of an ongoing effort to keep you informed about our latest work, I would like to let you know about some recently published SEI technical reports and notes. These reports highlight the latest work of SEI technologists in malware analysis, acquisition strategies, network situational awareness, resilience management (with three reports from this research area), incident management, and future architectures. This post includes a listing of each report, author(s), and links where the published reports can be accessed on the SEI website.

In October 2010, two packages from Yemen containing explosives were discovered on U.S.-bound cargo planes of two of the largest worldwide shipping companies, UPS and FedEx, according to reports by CNN and the Wall Street Journal. The discovery highlighted a long-standing problem--securing international cargo--and ushered in a new area of concern for such entities as the United States Postal Inspection Service (USPIS) and the Universal Postal Union (UPU), a specialized agency of the United Nations that regulates the postal services of 192 member countries. In early 2012, the UPU and several stakeholder organizations developed two standards to improve security in the transport of international mail and to improve the security of critical postal facilities. As with any new set of standards, however, a mechanism was needed to enable implementation of the standards and measure compliance to them. This blog post describes the method developed by researchers in the CERT Division at Carnegie Mellon University's Software Engineering Institute, in conjunction with the USPIS, to identify gaps in the security of international mail processing centers and similar shipping and transportation processing facilities.