Archive: 2018-11

Today, organizations build applications on top of existing platforms, frameworks, components, and tools; no one constructs software from scratch. Hence today's software development paradigm challenges developers to build trusted systems that include increasing numbers of largely untrusted components. Bad decisions are easy to make and have significant long-term consequences. For example, decisions based on outdated knowledge or documentation, or skewed to one criterion (such as performance) may lead to substantial quality problems, security risks, and technical debt over the life of the project. But there is typically a tradeoff between decision-making speed and confidence. Confidence increases with more experience, testing, analysis, and prototyping, but these all are costly and time consuming. In this blog post, I describe research that aims to increase both speed and confidence by applying existing automated-analysis techniques and tools (e.g., code and software-project repository analyses) mapping extracted information to common quality indicators from DoD projects.

Statistics and machine learning often use different terminology for similar concepts. I recently confronted this when I began reading about maximum causal entropy as part of a project on inverse reinforcement learning. Many of the terms were unfamiliar to me, but as I read closer, I realized that the concepts had close relationships with statistics concepts. This blog post presents a table of connections between terms that are standard in statistics and their related counterparts in machine learning.

Earlier this year, a team of researchers from the SEI CERT Division's Network Situational Awareness Team (CERT NetSA) released an update (3.17.0) to the System for Internet-Level Knowledge (SiLK) traffic analysis suite, which supports the efficient collection, storage, and analysis of network flow data, enabling network security analysts to query large historical traffic data sets rapidly and scalably. As this post describes, our team also recently updated the Network Traffic Analysis with SiLK handbook to make it more analyst-focused and teach not only the toolset but also the tradecraft around using it.

Software developers are increasingly pressured to rapidly deliver cutting-edge software at an affordable cost. An increasingly important software attribute is security, meaning that the software must be resistant to malicious attacks. Software becomes vulnerable when one or more weaknesses can be exploited by an attacker to cause to modify or access data, interrupt proper execution, or perform incorrect actions.