Archive: 2016-03

This is the third installment in a series of three blog posts highlighting seven recommended practices for acquiring intellectual property. This content was originally published on the Cyber Security & Information Analysis Center's website online environment known as SPRUCE (Systems and Software Producibility Collaboration Environment. The first post in the series explored the challenges to acquiring intellectual property. The second post in the series presented the first four of seven practices for acquiring intellectual property. This post will present the final three of seven practices for acquiring intellectual property as well as conditions under which organizations will derive the most benefit from recommended practices for acquiring intellectual property.

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When I was a chief architect working in industry, I was repeatedly asked the same questions: What makes an architect successful? What skills does a developer need to become a successful architect? There are no easy answers to these questions. For example, in my experience, architects are most successful when their skills and capabilities match a project's specific needs. Too often, in answering the question of what skills make a successful architect, the focus is on skills such as communication and leadership. While these are important, an architect must have strong technical skills to design, model, and analyze the architecture. As this post will explain, as a software system moves through its lifecycle, each phase calls for the architect to use a different mix of skills. This post also identifies three failure patterns that I have observed working with industry and government software projects.

This is the second installment in a series of three blog posts highlighting seven recommended practices for acquiring intellectual property. This content was originally published on the Cyber Security & Information Analysis Center's website online environment known as SPRUCE (Systems and Software Producibility Collaboration Environment. The first post in the series explored the challenges to acquiring intellectual property. This post, which can be read in its entirety on the SPRUCE website, will present the first four of seven best practices for acquiring intellectual property.

Software and acquisition professionals often have questions about recommended practices related to modern software development methods, techniques, and tools, such as how to apply Agile methods in government acquisition frameworks, systematic verification and validation of safety-critical systems, and operational risk management. In the Department of Defense (DoD), these techniques are just a few of the options available to face the myriad challenges in producing large, secure software-reliant systems on schedule and within budget.