Archive: 2015-04

Legacy systems represent a massive operations and maintenance (O&M) expense. According to a recent study, 75 percent of North American and European enterprise information technology (IT) budgets are expended on ongoing O&M, leaving a mere 25 percent for new investments. Another study found nearly three quarters of the U.S. federal IT budget is spent supporting legacy systems. For decades, the Department of Defense (DoD) has been attempting to modernize about 2,200 business systems, which are supported by billions of dollars in annual expenditures that are intended to support business functions and operations.

This post was co-authored by Bill Nichols.


Mitre's Top 25 Most Dangerous Software Errors is a list that details quality problems, as well as security problems. This list aims to help software developers "prevent the kinds of vulnerabilities that plague the software industry, by identifying and avoiding all-too-common mistakes that occur before software is even shipped." These vulnerabilities often result in software that does not function as intended, presenting an opportunity for attackers to compromise a system.

For two consecutive years, organizations reported that insider crimes caused comparable damage (34 percent) to external attacks (31 percent), according to a recent cybercrime report co-sponsored by the CERT Division at the Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute. Despite this near parity, media reports of attacks often focus on external attacks and their aftermath, yet an attack can be equally or even more devastating when carried out from within an organization. Insider threats are influenced by a combination of technical, behavioral, and organizational issues and must be addressed by policies, procedures, and technologies. Researchers at the CERT Insider Threat Center define insider threat as actions by an individual who meets the following criteria:

In 2014, approximately 1 billion records of personably identifiable information were compromised as a result of cybersecurity vulnerabilities. In the face of this onslaught of compromises, it is important to examine fundamental insecurities that CERT researchers have identified and that readers of the CERT/CC bloghave found compelling. This post, the first in a series highlighting CERT resources available to the public including blogs and vulnerability notes, focuses on the CERT/CC blog. This blog post highlights security vulnerability and network security resources to help organizations in government and industry protect against breaches that compromise data.