Archive: 2015-01

As part of an ongoing effort to keep you informed about our latest work, I would like to let you know about some recently published SEI technical reports and notes. These reports highlight the latest work of SEI technologists in software assurance, social networking tools, insider threat, and the Security Engineering Risk Analysis Framework (SERA). This post includes a listing of each report, author(s), and links where the published reports can be accessed on the SEI website.

This blog post is the sixth in a series on Agile adoption in regulated settings, such as the Department of Defense, Internal Revenue Service, and Food and Drug Administration.

"Across the government, we've decreased the time it takes across our high-impact investments to deliver functionality by 20 days over the past year alone. That is a big indicator that agencies across the board are adopting agile or agile-like practices," Lisa Schlosser, acting federal chief information officer, said in a November 2014 interview with Federal News Radio. Schlosser based her remarks on data collected by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) over the last year. In 2010, the OMB issued guidance calling on federal agencies to employ "shorter delivery time frames, an approach consistent with Agile" when developing or acquiring IT. As evidenced by the OMB data, Agile practices can help federal agencies and other organizations design and acquire software more effectively, but they need to understand the risks involved when contemplating the use of Agile. This ongoing series on Readiness & Fit Analysis (RFA) focuses on helping federal agencies and other organizations in regulated settings understand the risks involved when contemplating or embarking on a new approach to developing or acquiring software. Specifically, this blog post, the sixth in a series, explores issues related to system attributes organizations should consider when adopting Agile.

Attacks and disruptions to complex supply chains for information and communications technology (ICT) and services are increasingly gaining attention. Recent incidents, such as the Target breach, the HAVEX series of attacks on the energy infrastructure, and the recently disclosed series of intrusions affecting DoD TRANSCOM contractors, highlight supply chain risk management as a cross-cutting cybersecurity problem. This risk management problem goes by different names, for example, Supply Chain Risk Management (SCRM) or Risk Management for Third Party Relationships. The common challenge, however, is having confidence in the security practices and processes of entities on which an organization relies, when the relationship with those entities may be, at best, an arms-length agreement. This blog post highlights supply chain risks faced by the Department of Defense (DoD), federal civilian agencies, and industry; argues that these problems are more alike than different across these sectors; and introduces practices to help organizations better manage these risks.