Archive: 2012-07

While agile methods have become popular in commercial software development organizations, the engineering disciplines needed to apply agility to mission-critical, software-reliant systems are not as well defined or practiced. To help bridge this gap, the SEI recently hosted the Agile Research Forum. The event brought together researchers and practitioners from around the world to discuss when and how to best apply agile methods in mission-critical environments found in government and many industries. This blog posting, the fifth and final installment in a multi-part series highlighting research presented during the forum, summarizes a presentation I gave on the importance of applying agile methods to common operating platform environments (COPEs)that have become increasingly important for the Department of Defense (DoD).

While agile methods have become popular in commercial software development organizations, the engineering disciplines needed to apply agility to mission-critical, software-reliant systems are not as well defined or practiced. To help bridge this gap, the SEI recently hosted the Agile Research Forum. The event brought together researchers and practitioners from around the world to discuss when and how to best apply agile methods in mission-critical environments found in government and many industries.

While agile methods have become popular in commercial software development organizations, the engineering disciplines needed to apply agility to mission-critical, software-reliant systems are not as well defined or practiced. To help bridge this gap, the SEI recently hosted the Agile Research Forum. The event brought together researchers and practitioners from around the world to discuss when and how to best apply agile methods in mission-critical environments found in government and many industries. This blog posting, the third installment in a multi-part series highlighting research presented during the forum, summarizes a presentation made during the forum by Ipek Ozkaya, a senior researcher in the SEI's Research, Technology & System Solutions program, who discussed the use of agile architecture practices to manage strategic, intentional technical debt.

While agile methods have become popular in commercial software development organizations, the engineering disciplines needed to apply agility to mission-critical, software-reliant systems are not as well defined or practiced. To help bridge this gap, the SEI recently hosted the Agile Research Forum, which brought together researchers and practitioners from around the world to discuss when and how to best apply agile methods in mission-critical environments found in government and many industries. This blog posting, the second installment in a multi-part series, summarizes a presentation made during the forum by Mary Ann Lapham, a senior researcher in the SEI's Acquisition Support Program, who highlighted the importance of collaboration with end users, as well as among cross-functional teams, to facilitate the adoption of agile approaches into DoD acquisition programs.

While agile methods have become popular in commercial software development organizations, the engineering disciplines needed to apply agility to mission-critical software-reliant systems are not as well defined or practiced. To help bridge this gap, the SEI recently hosted the Agile Research Forum, which brought together researchers and practitioners from around the world to discuss when and how to best apply agile methods in the mission-critical environments found in government and many industries. This blog posting, the first in a multi-part series, highlights key ideas and issues associated with applying agile methods to address the challenges of complexity, exacting regulations, and schedule pressures that were presented during the forum.