Archive: 2012-01

As part of an ongoing effort to keep you informed about our latest work, I'd like to let you know about some recently published SEI technical reports and notes. These reports highlight the latest work of SEI technologists in insider threat, interoperability, service-oriented architecture, operational resilience, and automated remediation. This post includes a listing of each report, author(s), and links where the published reports can be accessed on the SEI website.

Managing technical debt, which refers to the rework and degraded quality resulting from overly hasty delivery of software capabilities to users, is an increasingly critical aspect of producing cost-effective, timely, and high-quality software products. A delicate balance is needed between the desire to release new software capabilities rapidly to satisfy users and the desire to practice sound software engineering that reduces rework.

In our work with acquisitionprograms, we've often observed a major problem: requirements specifications that are incomplete, with many functional requirements missing. Whereas requirements specifications typically specify normal system behavior, they are often woefully incomplete when it comes to off-nominal behavior, which deals with abnormal events and situations the system must detect and how the system must react when it detects that these events have occurred or situations exist. Thus, although requirements typically specify how the system must behave under normal conditions, they often do not adequately specify how the system must behave if it cannot or should not behave as normally expected. This blog post examines requirements engineering for off-nominal behavior.