Category: SATURN Conference

Longtime SATURN participant Eltjo Poort has posted a summary of SATURN 2017 on his blog. Eltjo was the winner of the inaugural Linda Northrop Software Architecture Award in 2016.

"This was my fifth SATURN conference," writes Poort, "and just like the previous years I returned home full of new ideas and inspiration, and with many useful new contacts. I am already looking forward to the 2018 edition in Plano, TX."

Read the whole thing.

Since 2010, the SEI and IEEE have been conferring two attendee-selected awards at SATURN. The IEEE Software SATURN Architecture in Practice Presentation Award is given to the presentation that best describes experiences, methods, and lessons learned from the implementation of software architecture practices. This year's award winner was Sebastian von Conrad of Envato for his presentation titled An In-Depth Look at Event Sourcing with Command Query Responsibility Segregation (CQRS). See presentation slides in PDF here.

The second award, the IEEE Software SATURN New Directions Presentation Award, is given to the presentation that best describes innovative new approaches and thought leadership in the application of software architecture practices. This year's award winner was George Fairbanks of Google for his presentation titled Functional Programming Invades Architecture. See presentation slides in PDF here.

In addition to reflecting the high regard of SATURN attendees, these awards also contribute to the maturation of the practice of software architecture by recognizing sound and innovative practices.

As the technical co-chairs for SATURN 2017, we're looking forward to welcoming you to the conference in a few weeks' time, and we're excited about the practical, forward-looking program that the hard-working program committee has assembled for the conference. We had many good sessions proposed and unfortunately had room for only a fraction of the submissions in the final program. However, we're sure you're going to find the sessions on the program relevant, engaging, and full of information to take back to work after the conference.

First, we have three terrific keynote talks to look forward to. Kevlin Henney will be speaking about the importance of detail in software development as he talks about Software is Details. Chris Richardson will talk about microservices as an architectural style as he tells us that There is No Such Thing as a Microservice!, while Jeromy Carriere will be exploring speed in software development in his talk, Velocity in Software Development: Why do Companies Slow Down and What Can We Do About It? Additionally, we're thrilled to have a talk from Ruth Malan, the recipient of this year's Linda Northrop Software Architecture Award.

We also have an excellent group of invited speakers. Kurt Stam will be talking about continuous deployment of microservices to be run on Docker and Kubernetes. Joe Yoder will talk about delivering fast with confidence while keeping your architecture clean. DDD expert Paul Rayner will tell us about EventStorming and how it can be used to map out an event-based story of how a software system behaves.

Beyond the keynotes and invited speakers, we have more than 50 peer-reviewed talks, plus training courses and the ever-popular Software Architecture Boot Camp sessions presented by SEI staff members.

These conference sessions explore a wide range of topics relevant to practicing architects, including DevOps, microservices, containers, serverless architectures, legacy systems, agility and architecture, cloud computing, continuous delivery, refactoring, technical debt, architecture evaluation, and technical leadership. All of the sessions have been carefully evaluated by our program committee and will provide practical, timely information to take back to work and apply immediately on your projects and across your organization.

We're very excited about the quality of the SATURN 2017 program, and we'd like to thank our program committee for their careful evaluation of the submissions and also to thank those who submitted session proposals, whether they were accepted for the final program or not.

We're looking forward to being part of this terrific event and of course gathering with our peer group of leading architecture practitioners in Colorado in May. We hope you can join us!

Jørn Ølmheim, Paulo Merson, and Eoin Woods
SATURN 2017 Technical Co-Chairs

You submitted a proposal to SATURN 2017, and it got accepted. Congratulations! When conference participants step into the room to attend your talk, they will come with the highest of expectations--after all, they chose your talk over the others happening in parallel. The people who click on the YouTube video of your talk in the future will also have high expectations. So we want to help you deliver a great talk.

Not everybody was born a great speaker, but those who weren't can easily apply a few tips that will get them closer to a (conference) rock-star performance. Here are 15 tips for creating and giving a great presentation at SATURN:

Preparation

  1. Provide value. Prepare a presentation that will allow attendees to successfully apply your ideas and experiences to their organizations.
  2. Avoid bloated slides. Audiences like illustrated slides better than text-heavy slides. Bulleted points should be no longer than two lines. Break long sentences into two bullets. If a slide has more than 5 or 6 bullets, consider splitting it into two slides.
  3. Enhance your presentation. Sensibly use pictures, graphs, tables, videos, callouts, animations, diagrams, and quotes to make your presentation more interesting. Imagery will improve attendees' retention and enjoyment.
  4. Create readable slides. A common complaint from SATURN evaluation forms is that slides were not readable, especially text in diagrams. For a simple way to check that all text is readable, print your presentation in 2 slides-per-page format. If you can easily read the printouts, the slides should be readable when projected.
  5. Manage time. Participants have also complained that presenters didn't cover all their slides or rushed through the final slides. If your session allows interaction throughout, be careful to cut short lengthy discussions. And above all, follow the tip below.
  6. Rehearse. The secret to a great presentation is practice, practice, practice. Rehearse your presentation at least a few times to train yourself on the flow of ideas. If you practice in front of the mirror, you can see what you look like when talking. You can also present to colleagues and get their feedback before heading to the conference. Don't forget to time yourself when rehearsing, and fine-tune the amount of material you can cover.

Delivery

  1. Be natural. Your audience will be made up of your peers, and they will help you do a great job. Relax and be yourself, as in a conversation by the water cooler. Do not switch to "presentation mode" and speak in a monotonic way like the Terminator (it's ok to dress up and look cool like him, though).
  2. Be engaging. It's your job to keep everyone awake and engaged, and that's not easy, especially after lunch. Be dynamic and energetic. Show that you're passionate about the topic. To establish a rapport with the audience, tell a relevant story or simply smile. Avoid reading notes or your slides. Make eye contact to random people in the room.
  3. In 1 minute, give attendees a reason to stay for the next 30 minutes. Often people are not sure that they have chosen the right session. The first minute of your talk will help them decide, and you don't want to see them sneaking out to the talk next door. State your goals up front. Tell attendees what they will learn. You should also have an initial slide, a quotation, or a story that grabs their attention.
  4. Pace yourself. Some people naturally talk fast; others talk fast when nervous. At a conference, especially one with an international audience like SATURN's, you should speak just fast enough to cover all the content, and slow enough to be understood by all. Be sure to enunciate and speak clearly.
  5. Avoid filler words. Um, well, if you have, like, a pre-teen and a teenager at home like I do, then you're kinda familiar with, like, filler words, sounds, and whatever. Filler words make your communication less effective. You only have so many minutes to cover the slides, so train yourself to avoid them. Instead of filler words, you can ... pause.
  6. Pause. At specific points in your presentation, be silent for a few seconds. Pause right after you make an important remark to let people absorb it or right before making an important point to emphasize it. You can also combine the pause with the next tip.
  7. Modulate your voice. Use inflection and vary the pitch of your voice to avoid a monotonic, boring speech. Throughout your presentation you should speak loudly enough to be heard by everybody in the room. You can lower your voice for emphasis--if you whisper a sentence on the microphone, your audience will listen attentively, but you should do it sparingly.
  8. Look at the audience. Presenters often turn to the screen to look at the slides. Some keep on talking to the screen. Do not turn sideways or turn your back to the audience. If you need to look at the slide, look at the laptop screen on the podium or table in front of you. You may need to turn to the screen to use a laser pointer, but do it sparingly. People who like the pointer sometimes unintentionally overuse it by pointing it at every sentence and every figure on the slides.
  9. Move purposefully. Standing still behind the podium for your entire presentation is not ideal. Move closer to the audience, for example, to tell a story or answer a question. Move toward the screen to emphasize the importance of the information on the slide. But don't meander around the stage as if you were thinking about why the sky is blue. Also avoid pacing from side to side--some people do that when nervous, and it is distracting. Mind your posture: stand balanced when you aren't moving, without rocking back and forth, and keep your hands naturally at your sides or use them in meaningful ways in your communication.

Since 2010, the SEI and IEEE have been conferring two attendee-selected awards at SATURN. The IEEE Software SATURN Architecture in Practice Presentation Award is given to the presentation that best describes experiences, methods, and lessons learned from the implementation of software architecture practices. This year's award winner was Patrick Kua of ThoughtWorks for his presentation titled Evolutionary Architecture.

The second award, the IEEE Software SATURN New Directions Presentation Award, is given to the presentation that best describes innovative new approaches and thought leadership in the application of software architecture practices. This year's award winner was João de Sousa of Robert Bosch LLC for his presentation titled Going Bezirk: Things Plus Cloud Do Not Equal IoT.

In addition to reflecting the high regard of SATURN attendees, these awards also contribute to the maturation of the practice of software architecture by recognizing sound and innovative practices.

The technical program at SATURN 2016 this year includes a track dedicated to the Internet of Things (IoT). Attendees will not want to miss one special event in this track, to be held on Wednesday evening, May 4 at 6:00 pm, when Kent Meyer of Emcraft Systems will present Kids and IoT: An Integrated IoT Educational Platform.

Kent will discuss how one tech-savvy parent who is raising two "digital-native" children is working to prepare the coming generation for the changes and career opportunities that the Internet of Things is bringing to our world. This session will include the kids who are part of Kent's weekly workshops and their IoT projects, which include robots, drones, and Chromebooks. The future of IoT may just rest with these smaller humans, and SATURN attendees will have the opportunity to check out their work.

Here is a preview:

SATURN 2016 will take place May 2-5, 2016 in San Diego, California. Registration is open, and we hope you will choose to participate.

With the emergence of an increasing number of conferences and professional-development opportunities in the field of software architecture, how is SATURN unique? Why should a software engineer choose to attend SATURN 2016?

SATURN is an annual gathering of software developers, architects, and thought leaders. At SATURN 2015 last April, 80% of the attendees had 10 or more years of experience and 56% were in leadership positions in their organizations. They gather to share experiences and ideas.

The relative experience of the SATURN community makes it uniquely qualified to evaluate the efficacy and practical utility of technology trends such as service-oriented architecture (SOA), microservices, and Internet of Things in a balanced way, avoiding reflexive promotion or advocacy.

"SATURN is about keeping the tribal history of software architecture and disseminating the fundamentals beyond current skills needed," says Len Bass, formerly of the SEI and of National Information and Communications Technology Australia (NICTA). "You will always want to know about the latest tools and the hottest methods, but more importantly, you will want to understand how to recognize the underlying concepts the next time a tool or method climbs the technology hype-cycle curve."

Such architectural knowledge building at SATURN provides learning and networking opportunities that have lasting value, greater than simply becoming familiar with the latest hot technical buzzwords.

The large number of experienced and technically savvy attendees at SATURN also affords junior developers or aspiring software architects the opportunity to network and learn from those with more experience, gain a solid understanding of techniques and methods that have been validated and proven to be effective, and find solutions to problems that others have solved in similar contexts. Knowledge sharing at SATURN happens through participatory sessions, tutorials, and open office hours with the creators of foundational techniques and methods.

SATURN has also evolved to be a conference where experience and research come together to forge new solutions to pressing problems, as a forum for articulating and exploring new ideas and leading-edge thinking. For example,

  • While software architecture training is now common in many global organizations, early adopters at SATURN began taking seminal software architecture courses from the SEI and others and sharing ideas, curricula, and experiences about developing software architectures in their own organizations.
  • Long before the coexistence of agile and architecture practices became a frequent topic of discussion in other technical venues, SATURN attendees were sharing their experiences and techniques for achieving agility at scale.

"We want SATURN to be thought of as the birthplace of new ideas and innovations in architecture-design practice," says Amine Chigani of GE Digital, a technical co-chair of SATURN 2016. If you are doing something new and interesting that you have successfully applied in a practical setting and that seems promising--even if it hasn't been proven yet--we want to hear about it.

Here are some examples of talks at SATURN conferences during the past few years that exemplify SATURN's balance of proven experience and new ideas that propel the discipline forward:

Proven experience:

New ideas:

DEV@SATURN

The DEV@SATURN (Design, Engineering, Vision) talks that we have added to the SATURN technical program this year are intended to reinforce the vision of SATURN as a forum for sharing experience-based insights and articulating new ideas and innovations. Patterned after the popular TED series of talks, DEV@SATURN talks will be short, concentrated bursts of experience, wisdom, and inspiration.

We seek talks that are

  • Visionary - They open a window that reveals or makes visible the future of software design or report on a breakthrough to a new idea or new solution to what had been an intractable problem.
  • Passionate - They are delivered by a speaker with a passionate commitment and need to share a paradigm-changing idea or insight.
  • Concrete - They tell specific stories about something that the speaker has done, such as an idea or lesson realized in the course of a project, a big problem and why it is important, a report of a personal journey that led to an insight or breakthrough, or something that everyone thought was impossible until the speaker discovered otherwise.

Please consider submitting a proposal for a DEV@SATURN or a longer talk, and if you have never attended SATURN before, please join our growing community and attend SATURN 2016.

A DEV(Design, Engineering, Vision)@SATURN talk is similar to a TED talk and concisely shares a single breakthrough technique, lesson, or experience in a passionate and inspiring way. We have a few slots available for these presentations at SATURN 2016.

DEV@SATURN talks will be particularly story based with lots of colorful images, simple charts, videos, and other visual props. They will be short: you have a maximum of 15 minutes, which will force you to focus on only what matters. Speaker delivery is critical; audiences will react equally to the message and the messenger. It will help to watch a couple of TED talks to get a sense of the style. Remember, there will be a select few of these sessions in the technical program, so submit a proposal for this session type only if you believe you have the right topic and delivery style to delight your SATURN community.

Your DEV@SATURN talk will really ignite your audience when you focus on using stories and pictures. The 4D outline is a great tool to help you think about your purpose for each point and how you want to convey that point. With this tool, you can create an exciting presentation that drives home what you want your audience to remember.

We look forward to seeing your proposals!


The 12th SEI Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) Conference 2016 will be held at the Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina in San Diego, California, May 2-5, 2016.

The SATURN 2016 Call for Submissions is now open.

Guest post by SATURN 2016 Program Committee Bett Correa, Architect at GE

So you are excited about presenting at SATURN 2016? Awesome!

One key question to ask is whether the audience will remember your presentation after the conference. There are a few tips I'd like to share that can help you give a memorable presentation.

When giving a presentation, focus on your audience and your purpose. Audience members may be saturated from having taken in so much information during the conference. You will leave a memorable impression on them only if you carefully construct your presentation. Grabbing their attention right from the beginning will help them realize that you are worth listening to. Make each slide purposeful. This might sound daunting but can be accomplished using a simple format I created called the 4D outline.

Before getting into the outline, define the following two items:

  1. Audience
  2. Purpose

The audience is just as important as the purpose--often people just have something to say and don't think about why they want to say it or to whom. Think of the difference between kindergarteners and software engineers. Take time to define these two items explicitly before moving on; doing so will greatly change how you create your presentation.

The example of a 4D outline shown below for an experience-report presentation demonstrates how such an outline forces you to think about each point and what you want to say.

table.PNG

Continue to create your outline for each section of your speech. Rather than filling your slides with long streams of text, find appropriate pictures/graphs for each section of your talk so that the audience has something to look at and doesn't have to read. Telling stories is an excellent way to keep your audience engaged. You can tell the same story over several slides.

The last few slides of your presentation should be the summary. This could be what you think the audience can take away and apply in their projects.

Once you have your presentation outline and slides put together, practice it between three to six times in front of others and alone to ensure that you know where on your slides you should make each point. While practicing you might find that you need to change slides around or change what you say on each. This is good! Keep making your presentation better and better. We strongly discourage you to rely too heavily on notes--doing so causes you to lose the essential connection with your audience that is so important to an effective presentation.

We hope you will follow the suggestions in this blog post and help us to make SATURN 2016 the best yet--good luck!

Bett Correa
Architect at GE

amine.pngAmine Chigani is a principal software architect at GE Digital. He leads the development of industrial internet-of-things (IoT) solutions for GE businesses and their customers in domains such as aviation, transportation, and energy. Amine is a founding member of the Industrial Internet Consortium's Architecture Working Group. Prior to his current assignment, Amine was an architect at GE Global Research, an architecture visiting scientist at the Software Engineering Institute (SEI), and CS adjunct faculty at Virginia Tech. Amine earned a PhD in Computer Science from Virginia Tech and the Software Architecture Professional Certificate from the SEI.

joe_olmheim.jpgJørn Ølmheim is a practicing software professional with strong beliefs in open source and internet technology. Currently he holds the position of leading advisor in corporate IT at Statoil, focusing on the subsurface application portfolio and systems integration challenges. He holds an MSc degree in computer science from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).

We welcome Amine and Jørn to the SATURN Technical Committee and look forward to working with them on SATURN 2016.

Bill Pollak
SATURN 2016 General Chair

Why the Internet of Things (IoT) as a special theme for SATURN 2016?
by Amine Chigani and Jørn Ølmheim

Over the past decade, SATURN has built a community of software architecture practitioners and researchers that is passionate about advancing the state of practice and quality of software development through software architecture. So who is better than this community and this conference to cut through the hype and discuss real architecture challenges and solutions to building IoT reference architectures, products, and services?

Now, why IoT and not some other theme?

The short answer is that it feels like everyone is talking about it. But the more intriguing motivation is the 2015 World Economic Forum identifying IoT and related technologies in its top ten priorities.

OK, but who is creating the hype?

Well, Gartner projects that around 50 billion devices, machines, and objects will connect to the Internet in the next 5 years. This is compared to a few billion people who are currently connected to the consumer Internet (and they are still a challenge to handle). A variety of large organizations such as ABB, Cisco, General Electric, Google, IBM, Intel, Microsoft, National Instruments, Siemens, and many others are focusing large resources in this emerging area. Venture capital is spurring a lot of IoT startups too. Unlike other waves of Internet technology transformations, IoT is touching both the consumer and the industrial sectors alike. One club where both of these worlds meet now is the Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC). After incubation on March 27, 2014 with only five founding members, the IIC now boosts more than 200 members from across the globe and is growing weekly.

What Industrial Internet are you speaking of?

Oh! This IoT thing goes by many names. The folks at the Industrial Internet talk about an internet of big things spitting out exabytes of sensor data. In China, there is a reference to Internet+. Of course, Germany has to have its own initiative with a cool name: Industry 4.0. To be even more inclusive, Cisco goes as far as the Internet of Everything. By the time we hold the conference, we will have few more perhaps.

I see. Why should architects care?

That's a good question! Have you heard about the Industrial Internet Reference Architecture that recently came out of IIC? The European Union folks spent a couple of years coming up with their IoT Architecture too. Let's stop at these two examples without going into the plethora of reference architectures and platforms for IoT that are out there. How many of these architectures can the SATURN community call architectures with capital A?

So this is real for architects. There are many software architects and engineers who are in in the midst of the IoT hype, and have to guide business leaders and technology executives to make sense of emerging IoT platforms, products, and services. Many are leading efforts to architect and build the technology infrastructure and solutions to take advantage of the opportunities afforded by moving into a more connected enterprise. This is why we thought we would highlight this theme and see what we can say about it.

How do we intend to run the IoT track?

We will bring together software architecture practitioners and researchers to share and learn from real-world experiences tackling architecture challenges in the IoT space. Don't worry! This will continue to feel like an architecture discussion. We will organize the track in a way that addresses the following questions:

  • What architecture challenges do IoT problems highlight?
  • What are the key quality attributes of IoT solutions, products, or platforms?
  • What architecture patterns and tactics are best suited to address these problems and to achieve these key quality attributes?

The IoT theme is intended to provide a relevant, large-enough problem space for attendees to engage in deep discussions and learning about real-world applications of architecture principles. Building on the software architecture technology and best practices of the past 25 years, speakers will share novel design and architecture advances in machine-to-machine connectivity, time-series data, big-data analytics, containerization, microservice design, cloud-native development, platforms, user experience, and cyber security as well as other architecture topics that provide the foundation for IoT solutions.

We will put together a track that blends both methodology and practice, but with a little bias toward submissions that demonstrate the value of software architecture in the successful delivery of quality software solutions in IoT space.

How can you contribute?

Submit a session proposal to this track and share this blog with your network. If you stumbled across this blog post by searching for what is happening in the IoT space, then check out the SATURN 2016 Call for Submissions.

Now that you found this blog, bookmark it and come back again as we plan to keep the discussion going. So stay tuned!

Amine Chigani, GE Digital
Jørn Ølmheim, Statoil

SATURN 2016 Technical Co-Chairs

The 12th SEI Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) Conference 2016 will be held at the Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina in San Diego, California, May 2-5, 2016. We are pleased to announce that the co-technical chairs of SATURN 2016 will be Amine Chigani of GE Digital and Jørn Ølmheim of Statoil.

The SATURN 2016 Call for Submissions is now open.

What's New for 2016

SATURN 2016 will feature the Internet of Things (IoT) as a theme for one of its four tracks. This theme is intended to inspire the SATURN architecture community to cut through the hype and discuss real architecture challenges and solutions to building IoT reference architectures, products, and services. For more about the decision to dedicate a track to IoT, see this post by Amine and Jørn.

This year's technical program is organized into four tracks: (1) Architecting for the Internet of Things, (2) Architecture Methods and Design Patterns, (3) Technology and Tools, and (4) Leadership and Business. More information about these tracks and about session types and lengths is available in the SATURN 2016 Call for Submissions.

All proposals must be submitted to the online submission system no later than January 15, 2016. Presenters whose proposals are accepted will receive free or discounted admission to the conference depending on the submission type.

Lots more information about SATURN 2016 will be forthcoming here on the SATURN blog and on the SEI and SATURN 2016 websites. We hope you will begin making plans to join us in San Diego next May and that you will consider being part of the technical program by submitting a proposal.

One of our goals every year with SATURN is to create a solid technical program that is informative, engaging, and lasting. When evaluating proposals for the program, the review committee uses the following guidelines to help decide whether a proposal is a good match for this year's conference. In these guidelines, the term "session" is used generically to describe any talks, workshops, tutorials, and so on in the conference program.

Informative sessions share meaningful insights with lessons that attendees will be able to apply directly with their teams after the conference.

  • Is the information proposed relevant to one of the topic themes in this year's conference?
  • Are there succinct lessons supported by real-world examples, research, or direct experience?
  • Is the topic of broad or general interest?
  • Can the lessons be applied beyond small sub-communities of practice?

Engaging sessions create an active learning environment that promotes information retention and generally gets attendees excited about the topics discussed.

  • Did the speakers have an impact on their organizations related to the lessons or insights proposed?
  • Do the speakers appear to be knowledgeable of the topics proposed?
  • Do the speakers have a history of successful, engaging, educational, energetic, passionate, or entertaining presentations?
  • Have the speakers shown an attention to detail in preparing their proposal?
  • For participative sessions and tutorials, will the proposed session create an effective learning experience for attendees?

Lasting sessions have appeal beyond current fads and attempt to weave new ideas into our overall understanding of how we develop software systems.

  • Does the proposed session advance the current state of practice?
  • Does the proposed session improve our depth of understanding in software architecture?
  • Does the proposed session present a unique or novel project experience?
  • Does the proposed session offer a unique or fresh perspective on "classic" topics?

Our intent in sharing this information is to help you to write the best proposal possible. Use these evaluation guidelines to tailor your proposals and help create the best SATURN Conference yet. Strong proposals will have some "yes" answers in each of the guidelines. Also note that these are only guidelines and not hard-and-fast rules. We are excited to see all the great ideas that are proposed!

- Amine Chigani
- Jørn Ølmheim
SATURN 2016 Technical Co-Chairs

SATURN 2016 will be held in San Diego, California, May 2-5, 2016. See the SATURN 2016 Call for Submissions to learn how you can submit an abstract to present your ideas at SATURN 2015. Please submit proposals for 15-, 30-, and 90-minute sessions to the online submission system no later than January 15, 2016. The technical committee will offer discounted conference attendance to those selected to be part of the program; specific compensation details will be posted on the SATURN 2016 website soon.

For those who were unable to attend the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) 2015 Conference, videos of many SATURN 2015 presentations are now available to view online

SATURN 2016 will be held at the Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina in San Diego, California, May 2-5. The SATURN Technical Committee will release the Call for Submissions for SATURN 2016 during the first week in September. We are opening the Call early this year to allow more time to submit proposals for the outstanding presentations you have come to expect from SATURN as the premier architecture conference for senior engineers. Watch for an announcement here soon!

Researchers in the Software Solutions Division at the Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute (SEI) are seeking volunteers to participate in a study to identify and measure complexity in software models and to evaluate quality, productivity, and modeling tool usage outcomes in the context of complexity. The Effective Reduction of Avoidable Complexity in Embedded Systems (ERACES) Experimentis seeking up to 70 participants from two communities:

  • computer science students at a college or university
  • industry and government professionals from the software development domain

The call for participation is open now through June 30, 2015.

On Monday, April 27, before the start of SATURN 2015, a small group of 16 software engineers met to explore ideas around the emerging microservices architecture trend. Microservices have seen a rapid rise in popularity over the past year or so, and we thought it would make an interesting topic of discussion. Sam Newman's book covers significant ground and yet there there are still many nuances that we don't fully understand.

We were honored to have Gregor Hohpe, chief IT architect at Allianz, as one of our three keynote speakers this year at SATURN. In fact, we have been trying for several years to persuade Gregor to speak for us; this was the first time we succeeded.

Gregor has kindly posted his impressions of SATURN 2015 to his blog, and I urge you to read them. SATURN, writes Gregor, is "an amazing event [that is] a perfect blend of structured thinking from the academic edge combined with valuable industry experience."

Many thanks to Gregor for his contributions to SATURN 2015 and his great blog post.

Bill Pollak
SATURN 2015 General Chair

Since 2010, the SEI and IEEE have been conferring two attendee-selected awards at SATURN. The IEEE Software SATURN Architecture in Practice Presentation Award is given to the presentation that best describes experiences, methods, and lessons learned from the implementation of architecture-centric practices. This year's award winners were Jochem Schulenklopper and Eelco Rommes of inspearit for their presentation titled Why They Just Don't Get It: Communicating Architecture to Business Stakeholders.

Mark Schwartz, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Schwartz discussed some projects that he has led and lessons learned from the experiences in building systems for the government. He is CIO of one of three agencies that deal with immigration. USCIS processes 7 million applications per year for green cards, refugee status, citizenship, and other cases. USCIS is part of the Department of Homeland Security, which is important because the agency is under two tiers of enterprise architecture, and everybody wants to tell everybody else what to do. USCIS manages about 70 legacy IT systems, and Schwartz discussed three new projects.

Marisa Sanchez, Independent Consultant Sanchez works in the arena of large-scale technology change and facilitated a participatory session on how to engage your most critical stakeholders to support your project. Her stakeholder engagement framework has three steps:

(1) identify stakeholders,

(2) analyze stakeholders, and

(3) develop engagement strategies.

Jungwoo Ryoo, Pennsylvania State University, and Rick Kazman, University of Hawaii and Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute

by Jacob Tate, Mount St. Mary's University

In his talk titled "Architectural Analysis for Security (AAFS)," Jungwoo Ryoo explained that there is an absence of security practices in software architecture. His research concerns developing and implementing a methodology to test and secure software systems starting at the design phase. The architectural analysis is basically a structured way of discovering these security issues. It has frequently been common to implement methods like this after the design of the system, and Dr. Ryoo warned against this.

Amine Chigani and Yun Freund, GE Software

At GE, software is a horizontal capability in the company, with over 14,000 software professionals in the business. GE Software is launching the Predix™ platform, which will be a common theme across all of GE's industries, and the company will make this platform available to the world later this year.

Jeromy Carriere, Rick Buskens, and Jack Greenfield, Google
Evolving Mission-Critical "Legacy" Systems, Rick Buskens

Buskens's team is a multisite team that works on a suite of projects focused on Google's internal structure, while others are external-facing and cloud. The infrastructure for running services at Google is built on Borg, a cluster-management system that runs hundreds of thousands of jobs across thousands of applications in clusters of tens of thousands of machines. Borg is an internal cloud infrastructure, whose users have many different needs; a service configuration specification called BCL (Borg Configuration Language) allows users to tell Borg what those needs are. Buskens's team works on Borg Config, which interprets the service configuration for Borg; it manages the millions of jobs running each day. BorgCron works for scheduled and repeated tasks at Google scale.

Jane Orsulak and Julie Kent, Raytheon
by Jacob Tate, Mount St. Mary's University

Jane Orsulak and Julie Kent kicked off the experience-presentation session on SATURN's final day by talking about "System Characterization: An Approach to Modernizing Disparate Legacy Systems." In this presentation, they gave a summary of some of the training that soldiers have to go through, such as live training and virtual training.

Rebecca Wirfs-Brock, Wirfs-Brock Associates, and Joseph Yoder, The Refactory, Inc.

How do you make quality happen? Budget time for quality discussions and quality testing. During envisioning and requirements gathering, identify core qualities. The core goal of agile and lean was not just to go faster, but to get rid of waste. Quality can be a result of those processes, but you need to engineer for quality by architecting for quality and then testing for it. You'll also need to determine appropriate times when qualities can be tested and delivered.

Len Bass; Sascha Bates, Chef; Sam Newman, ThoughtWorks
by Jacob Tate, Mount St. Mary's University

Len Bass, Sascha Bates, and Sam Newman started off the afternoon session with a presentation titled "DevOps: Essentials for Software Architects." Dr. Bass introduced this session by explaining exactly what the speakers will mean by "DevOps." He stated that after software architects or engineers finish their job, it often takes too long to get their code into production. DevOps is concerned with reducing the time from code completion to code production. Errors in code and miscommunication about which versions of which tools are being used are some of the biggest problems causing the process to be slow. We can speed up deployment by setting up an architecture so that development teams do not have to coordinate with each other; this coordination is where a lot of time is lost.

Matthias Naab, Fraunhofer IESE; Ralf Carbon, John Deere; and Susanne Braun, Fraunhofer IESE

by Jacob Tate, Mount St. Mary's University
Drs. Ralf Carbon and Matthias Naab kicked off the short-presentation afternoon session with their talk titled "Never Again Offline?!? Experiences on the Outstanding Role of Data in a Large-Scale Mobile App Ecosystem." As you might gather from the lengthy title, there was an abundance of information packed into these 30 minutes.

Gloria Ingabire, Carnegie Mellon University

OpenMRS is an existing, robust medical record system (MRS), and Ingabire is proposing some additional functions for it, called OpenMRS+. She was inspired to take on this challenge by her mother's history of diabetes and uncle's history of cardiovascular disease. If people knew the likelihood of getting a non-communicable disease, they might be more likely to take precautions.

Simon Brown, Coding the Architecture

by Jacob Tate, Mount St. Mary's University
Simon Brown taught us a lot in his session titled "Software Architecture as Code." From teaching us where Jersey is to how to extract architecture from code, Brown gave a riveting talk on bridging the gap between architecture and code. Diagrams for software architecture are often messy; one developer cannot distinguish another's way of thinking by looking at sloppy boxes and mismatched lines. Would we write our code this way? Our code does not map to the architectural views we created, and this is a problem.

Forrest Shull, Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI);
Thomas DuBois, The Boeing Company;
Nick Guertin, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation;
Michael McLendon, SEI;
and Douglas C. Schmidt, Vanderbilt University and SEI

Forrest Shull opened the session with a brief introduction to Open Systems Architectures (OSA), an initiative within the DoD, to make systems more configurable and adaptable than they are today. This initiative ties in with the Better Buying Power Initiative, which focuses on making systems more efficient and effective. It's about system architecture, but software architecture is buried within that. How do we make systems more modular, more open, and still deal with interfaces between the components when the systems are part of a community? How much to make open and how much to keep behind the wall are issues that this initiative must deal with. Each panelist gave a brief on their opinions of where OSA stands today and what its challenges are.

Ariadna Font Llitjós, IBM Watson Group; Jonathan Berger, Pivotal Labs; and Jeff Patton, Jeff Patton & Associates
Font Llitjós began this conversation-style panel with a brief review of Design Thinking 101: "Design is not a product designers produce"; "design is a process designers facilitate." Then she introduced IBM's method, which includes four modes of design thinking: Understand, Explore, Make/build/prototype, and Validate/iterate.

Paul Boos, Santeon Group
by Jacob Tate, Mount St. Mary's University

Paul Boos introduced us to a little Japanese in his talk titled "Improving Architectural Refactoring Using Kanban and the Mikado Method." These methods have been employed by such companies as Toyota to drastically increase production speed while tracking progress. But how does this translate from assembly lines to software?

Rick Kazman, University of Hawaii and Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute, and Humberto Cervantes, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa
Design is hard. Architects need insight into types of architectural drivers, guidance on selecting design concepts, and what drives certain design decisions to make good decisions by considering these consciously. Architects also need an approach to negotiate with management and stakeholders better to make these good decisions. In this tutorial session, Kazman and Cervantes presented an updated version of the 2006 Architecture-Driven Design Method 2.0 to address these concerns.

Einar Landre and Jørn Ølmheim, Statoil

by Jacob Tate, Mount St. Mary's University
Einar Landre presented an experience report at the last morning session titled "Systems of Action: A Stack Model for Capability Classification." The subject matter of this presentation delved into the importance of structuring a class of systems that can observe phenomena or processes and then interpret this data and make intelligent decisions.

Michael Keeling, IBM Watson Group
The concept of design as a way of thinking comes from Herbert Simon in 1969. Companies would empathize with the user and work to solve their problems, but this approach had the unintended side effect of focusing too exclusively on the user interface, and there is more to design in software than the user interface. Software architecture is the perspective that holds all the perspectives together: users, business needs, and more.

George Fairbanks, Google
In this experience report, George Fairbanks discusses his recent experiences from assembling large bits of software. He reminds us of how sneakily dependencies become complicated through the analogy of the frog in a gradually heating pot of water. Architects could solve the complexity problem up front in a waterfall process, but how and when can they architecturally intervene in an incremental development process?

Mary Shaw, Carnegie Mellon University

by Jacob Tate, Mount St. Mary's University
The SATURN 2015 Conference is underway, and what a great start! As the largest SATURN Conference to date with over 200 attendees, you can feel the excitement and buzz of the people who traveled from all over the globe to attend. It kicked off yesterday with a few special sessions and classes, but more notably with the introductions and the first keynote speaker this morning. Mary Shaw gave a fast-paced lecture on the progress of engineering in terms of the software discipline. She explored the question "Is software engineering really engineering?" and systematically explained the various definitions of engineering, such as "creating cost-effective solutions to practical problems by applying codified knowledge and building things in the service of mankind."

At SATURN 2015, the software architecture community will put microservices on trial. Here is an abstract of this event, which will take place on Tuesday, April 28, from 5:00 to 6:00 pm:

Microservices architecture has emerged as a widely discussed style of building distributed web and internet systems. Proponents argue that this variant of service-oriented architecture (SOA) is well suited to address the challenges of cloud computing, scalability, increased flexibility, and complexity, among others. But haven’t we seen this all before? Is there really anything new and interesting about microservices architecture? Or is this simply a case of history repeating itself, like the last time service-oriented architectures were all the rage? Microservices architecture is hereby charged with being an attractive nuisance in the first degree. SATURN 2015 has recruited an expert panel of judges to debate the benefits and perils of microservices architecture and help you, the jury, learn the facts and determine the final verdict.

As the field of software architecture has matured over the years, its concepts and terminology can be barriers to newcomers. In past years, the SATURN program was geared toward those who had attended SEI courses or had otherwise steeped themselves in the canon (a pretty hefty bookshelf). For those who had not yet done so, the SEI offered its introductory courses before the conference began.

This year, at no additional cost, the SATURN 2015 technical program includes a series of sessions intended for beginners, novices, and aspiring software architects. This Architecture Boot Camp will be held early in the conference program and led by experienced instructors from the SEI technical staff. You don't have to attend every Boot Camp session, and you can interleave them with the main schedule.

Women in Software Architecture
As part of National Women's History Month, Pittsburgh Urban Media salutes Dr. Mary Shaw, recipient of the National Medal of Technology and Innovation in 2014. Dr. Shaw is a leader in software engineering research whose work on software architecture helped establish it as a recognized discipline, and PUM's interview with her reveals how she got an early start in a field dominated by men and what she is most proud of today. We are pleased that Dr. Shaw will give a keynote talk at SATURN 2015, and we use this week's link roundup to highlight other women of the software architecture discipline who will also present at SATURN 2015. Discovering Alexander's Properties In Your Code: In this presentation from Smalltalks 2014, Rebecca Wirfs-Brock of Wirfs-Brock Associates explains how Christopher Alexander, the building architect, inspired the first software patterns with his patterns for buildings and architecture and why she thinks his latest work could influence how you code.

by George Fairbanks and Michael Keeling, SATURN 2015 Co-Technical Chairs

When we attend technical conferences, the sessions we appreciate most and remember long after the conference ends are those in which influential, creative thinkers share and explore ideas that excite them. If you have had this experience at conferences you have attended, you'll agree: when a gifted speaker expands minds by challenging well-worn assumptions and articulating groundbreaking ideas, you can feel the energy in the room.

Because we wanted this experience at SATURN 2015, both for ourselves and for our attendees, we invited some of the most influential thinkers in the field of software architecture to participate in the conference program. And not only did we invite a collection of people we knew would electrify a room with their ideas; we also asked them to curate their own sessions by inviting additional speakers who have inspired them. The result: we are pleased to introduce the Invited Speakers Series, new this year at SATURN 2015.

At SATURN 2015, to be held in Baltimore, Maryland, April 27-30, 2015, the SEI will augment the three-day technical program with three one-day courses offered on Monday, April 27. SEI courses are created and delivered by recognized experts who have practical experience in the disciplines they teach. Our courses feature participatory tasks and real-world scenarios to enhance your learning

Big Data: Architectures and Technologies (instructors, Ian Gorton and John Klein) Scalable big-data systems are significant long-term investments that must scale to handle ever-increasing data volumes, and therefore represent high-risk applications in which the software and data architectures are fundamental components of ensuring success. This one-day course is designed for architects and technical stakeholders such as product managers, development managers, and systems engineers involved in the development of big data applications. More information Register now


Software Architecture Modeling
Last summer, a Mother Jones article by Tasneem Raja asked, "Is coding the new literacy?" The answer is yes and no, because the point is not to increase "the number of kids who can crank out thousands of lines of JavaScript" but "to boost the number who understand what code can do" and can think up good ways to apply it. To do this, computer science education must first undergo a paradigm shift, from "reinforcing the notion that code is just for coders" to leading with computational thinking, which CMU's Jeannette Wing defines as "solving problems, designing systems, and understanding human behavior."

At SATURN, we hate the idea that a good talk might be rejected because its abstract is unclear or doesn't answer questions that the reviewers might ask. Good talks should not be rejected because the proposal is not absolutely perfect. So last year we introduced an early-acceptance deadline for speaker submissions, and it worked out really well. The quality of presentations was higher than in years past, and we overcame the dreaded Student's Syndrome--everyone waiting until the night before to submit. But this year we asked ourselves, Can we give even more opportunities? Can we make the proposal process even more friendly? For SATURN 2015, we have adopted a rolling-acceptance approach.This means that the review committee is continuously reviewing speaker proposals as they are submitted. When reviewers see a great proposal, it is accepted immediately and added to the technical program. Authors of other proposals get detailed feedback about what the reviewers are thinking and what questions they have, so they can revise and resubmit. No longer will you have to hire a soothsayer to guess what the committee might have been thinking, only to have the feedback too late to do anything about it. We have been accepting speaker proposals since October though the website was lagging a bit. That has been corrected and the full list of speakers accepted is now available.

For pioneering leadership in the development of innovative curricula in computer science, Dr. Mary Shaw of Carnegie Mellon University received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation from President Barack Obama during a White House ceremony in November 2014. The SATURN 2015 program committee is pleased to announce that Dr. Shaw will deliver a keynote presentation at SATURN 2015, which will be held at the Lord Baltimore Hotel in Baltimore, Maryland, April 27-30.

How has something you learned or saw at SATURN changed how you develop software? Since the first conference in 2004, SATURN has been a place for software developers to share stories about our adventures in building software. Architects, managers, and programmers from across industries and the world came together once a year to share stories about our experiences applying software architecture-centric practices.

One of our goals every year with SATURN is to create a solid technical program that is informative, engaging, and lasting. When evaluating proposals for the program, the review committee uses the following guidelines to help decide whether a proposal is a good match for this year’s conference. In these guidelines, the term “session” is used generically to describe any talks, workshops, tutorials, and so on in the conference program. Informative sessions share meaningful insights with lessons that attendees will be able to apply directly with their teams after the conference.

  • Is the information proposed relevant to one of the topic themes in this year’s conference?
  • Are there succinct lessons supported by real-world examples, research, or direct experience?
  • Is the topic of broad or general interest?
  • Can the lessons be applied beyond small sub-communities of practice?
Engaging sessions create an active learning environment that promotes information retention and generally gets attendees excited about the topics discussed.

The SEI Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) Conference 2015 will be held at the Lord Baltimore Hotel in Baltimore, Maryland, April 27--30, 2015. We are pleased to announce that the co-technical chairs of SATURN 2015 will be George Fairbanks of Google and Michael Keeling of IBM. Based on your feedback in the hallways in Portland and from post-conference surveys, George, Michael, and the rest of the SATURN technical committee have designed SATURN 2015 to better meet your needs in a practitioner-oriented technical conference. The SATURN 2015 Call for Submissions is now open. As described in the Call, we will immediately begin a rolling-acceptance process for proposal submissions, so submit early to get feedback and improve your chances.

What’s New for 2015

By Jørn Ølmheim and Harald Wesenberg Statoil ASA We were fortunate enough to be able to participate at SATURN 2014. For Jørn, this was his first time at SATURN, while for Harald it was the fourth SATURN conference. As always, we knew that the quality of the conference content is high, and we were looking forward to a fun week with learning new and interesting ideas from other practitioners. In this group of excellent presentations and tutorials there were many that stood out, but to us George Fairbanks' talk on teaching architecture was definitely one of the greatest. Many of the more experienced participants at the conference recognized George's experiences of trying to teach the importance of architecture to the junior team members with varying degree of success, so we were well motivated for a discussion about how this can be done better. Many of us recognize the challenges of motivation and lack of commitment both from your peers and the company to spend time on such activities.

by Rey Hernandez Sony Network Entertainment International @DeveloperRey Many times in a project, software or otherwise, the people working on the project become so entrenched in the methods they find familiar that they allow roadblocks to get in the way of project completion. All too often those roadblocks lead to missed deadlines, cut corners, general reduction in team morale, and ultimately a product that does not meet customer expectations. In his keynote at SATURN 2014, Joe Justice of Team Wikispeed and Scrum Inc., treated us to a refreshing view of project management that illustrates how teams can be extremely productive, with high morale, and great customer satisfaction.

by Anthony Tsakiris Ford Motor Company Architecture development activities as presented in books, articles, and classes are sometimes “heavy” – that is, they require a lot of time and people resources relative to what is available. That’s my view from an automotive embedded-control-systems environment. An argument can be made that that’s what it takes, but there’s another reality that time and resources are truly in short supply. It’s difficult to get stakeholders who are busy with multiple projects and production concerns to commit big chunks of their time to an activity like a Quality Attribute Workshop for a new project.

by Russell Miller Vice President of Technology Services at Impulse.com Co-host of Architectural Concepts podcast At SATURN 2014 there were a number of excellent sessions on DevOps and Continuous Delivery; one of those was Dianne Marsh’s keynote entitled, “Engineering Velocity: Continuous Delivery at Netflix.” Dianne is the director of engineering tools at Netflix, a company that has led the way in terms of continuous delivery. Dianne’s main objective for the talk was to share details and philosophy from Netflix that the audience could consider for application in their organizations as a means to improve their velocity. She did a great job achieving that objective.

Portland, Oregon native and well-known writer and blogger Scott Hanselman spoke at SATURN 2014 this year ("JaveScript, the Cloud, and the New Virtual Machine") and, while there, he interviewed Len Bass for The Hanselminutes Podcast: Fresh Air for Developers. Len is a senior principal researcher at NICTA in Australia. During his long and distinguished career at the SEI, Len was co-author many seminal publications in the field of software architecture including Software Architecture in Practice. In the podcast, Stories of Computer Science Past and Present with Len Bass, Len shares stories from his 40+ year career in software.

Notes by Ziyad Alsaeed, edited by Tamara Marshall-Keim Transparency: An Architecture Principle for Socio-Technical Ecosystems Felix Bachmann and Linda Northrop, Software Engineering Institute Felix and Linda shared their experience as a team in the XSEDE project. They presented compelling evidence of the need to have transparent architecture and architectural practices in socio-technical ecosystems like XSEDE. XSEDE is a virtual, high-performance computer system that allows interactivity for scientists (e.g., biologists, mechanical engineers, environmentalists) all over the world to run their experiments. Experiments are usually of the types that need super-powerful computing capabilities. The system is distributed over a wide distance, and engineers or developers have different global and local priorities. Due to the size of the project and the high complexity, architectural guidance was necessary to ensure the success of the project. Felix’s and Linda’s team responsibilities are to help the team make the right architectural decisions, coach the team on how to incorporate architectural practices, and research missions.

Notes by Ziyad Alsaeed, edited by Tamara Marshall-Keim Can You Hear Me Now? The Art of Applying Communication Protocols When Architecting Real-Time Control Systems Todd Farley, BAE Systems, Inc. BAE Systems deals with architecting real-time control systems. These systems are usually complicated and distributed. Also, the lifetimes of projects are usually very long. So BAE must always answer this question: Which process should they adapt? The problems they face tend to fall into three categories:

  • motion control systems (~robots)
  • computation-intensive algorithms
  • user interfaces

Notes by Ziyad Alsaeed, edited by Tamara Marshall-Keim BI/Big Data Reference Architectures and Case Studies Serhiy Haziyev and Olha Hrytsay, SoftServe, Inc. Serhiy and Olha shared their experience with the tradeoff between modern and traditional (non-relational and relational) reference architectures. They looked into the challenges associated with each approach and gave tips from real-life case studies on how to deal with big data reference architecture. As a reminder, they visited some of the known big data challenges:

  • Data is generated from many and different sources.
  • As data grows, it becomes complicated and heterogeneous (velocity and volume) until it’s no longer manageable.

Notes by Ziyad Alsaeed, edited by Tamara Marshall-Keim Under N: Acceptance to Delivery in N Hours Umashankar Velusamy, Verizon Communications, Inc. Umashankar started the presentation with a simple question: Are all deliveries the same? Humans take about 9 months to “deliver” babies. Cats and dogs take about 2 months to do so. So not all deliveries are the same. In the software industry, the same thing applies—different deliveries take different amounts of time. However, we tend to apply a one-size-fits-all solution to everything. Umashankar asked another question: Does it make since to wait 2 weeks or even 2 months for something to deliver, when it takes only 12 hours to deliver? It’s definitely doesn’t make sense, Umashankar answers.

Notes by Scott Shipp, edited by Tamara Marshall-Keim CORBA to Web Services Migration Using Model-Driven Approaches and Offshoring Georg Huettenegger, Credit Suisse Huettenegger discussed challenges and lessons learned from migrating one of the world's largest and most successful CORBA SOAs to a web services SOA. Credit Suisse is an integrated global bank. It delivers all the possible services that a bank could offer. Credit Suisse employs more than 45,000 people from 160 nations. The current Credit Suisse SOA is "nice, yet limited." Where it is headed is not good. It has over 2,500 CORBA service operations, there are 20–30 Mill CORBA calls per day, and there are about 400 consuming applications. With such a large scale and with such widely distributed employees, maybe Agile is not the way to go.

Notes by Scott Shipp, edited by Tamara Marshall-Keim Impact of Architecture on Continuous Delivery Russell Miller, SunView Software, Inc. First, context: This was a greenfield, from-scratch project for a nontrivial social-monitoring tool. It was also their first attempt at the native cloud. It was a pilot for a truly agile project. Go to http://livepulse.co to see a beta version. Miller uses the term “continuous delivery” (CD) as defined in Jez Humble's book Continuous Delivery. It leverages continuous integration, automated testing, and automated deployment. Releases are frequent, small, and predictable. For example, take Amazon drone delivery. It eliminates waste, and customers do not have time to cancel the order. It also provides quicker feedback from the customer. So CD vs. the traditional release model is similar to drone delivery vs. freight train delivery. "This is a good metaphor for lean vs. legacy."

Since 2010, the SEI and IEEE have been conferring two attendee-selected awards at SATURN. The IEEE Software SATURN Architecture in Practice Presentation Award is given to the presentation that best describes experiences, methods, and lessons learned from the implementation of architecture-centric practices. Anthony Tsakiris of Ford Motor Company, Jeromy Carriere of eBay, Inc., Michael Keeling of Vivisimo, and Simon Brown of Coding the Architecture received this award in 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2013 respectively. This year’s award winners were Will Chaparro and Michael Keeling of IBM for their presentation titled Facilitating the Mini-Quality Attributes Workshop.

Notes by Ziyad Alsaeed, edited by Tamara Marshall-Keim Expanding Legacy Systems Using Model-Driven Engineering (MDE) William Smith, Northrop Grumman Kevin Nguyen, Northrop Grumman Kevin Nguyen and his fellow engineers faced a common problem of dealing with legacy systems. At their environment (Northrop Grumman), they are dealing with rigid defense systems. Kevin tried to adapt a model-driven engineering approach in his work to achieve his goals. The team used conceptual software architecture to help understand customer requirements. Next, they refined the requirements into a CSCI architecture of software and hardware. Then, they tried to expand the CSCI architecture into CSC architecture (more detailed and lower level models). Finally, the team tried to convert that into a detailed design for the software unit. They went through these steps following a basic procedure of software-design life cycle.

Notes by Scott Shipp, edited by Tamara Marshall-Keim Metrics for Simplifying and Standardizing Enterprise Architecture: An Experience Report for an Oil and Gas Organization Alexis Ocampo (Ecopetrol) Jens Heidrich (Fraunhofer IESE) Constanza Lampasona (Fraunhofer IESE) Victor Basili (University of Maryland, Fraunhofer CESE) Some data about Ecopetrol S.A.

  • largest petroleum company in Colombia
  • One of four largest Latin American oil and gas companies
  • 1M barrels will be produced 2015
  • Top 40 world oil and gas companies
How can IT contribute? They have been working on answering this question for several years.

Notes by Scott Shipp

Past, Present, and Future of APIs for Mobile and Web Apps

Ole Lensmar, SmartBear Software

Ole Lensmar is from Sweden and has been in the API space since the late '90s. He has created one of the most popular API testing tools in the world SoapAPI. He also is the CTO of SmartBear solutions.

Once upon a time, people tried to connect distributed systems with

  • DCE/RPC
  • CORBA
  • COM / DCOM
  • J2EE / RMI

The international software architecture community has responded to this year's SATURN technical program with another year of strong registration for the SEI Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) Conference. SATURN, now in its 10th year, will be held at the Marriott Downtown Waterfront in Portland, Oregon, from May 5 through 9, 2014, and registration is still open. Currently 180 people are registered to attend, and it is likely that this year's conference will come close to or exceed the record attendance of 207 in Minneapolis in 2013. We are excited to inform you about two late additions to the technical program.

SATURN 2014 will be in Portland, Oregon on May 5-9, 2014. Portland: A doughnut shop where you can get married. An ice cream counter that tops sundaes with worms. A museum where vacuum cleaners are out of the closet. A city park that can fit only one person at a time. Costumed adults who ride bikes with banana seats down a 710-foot hill. Read all about it.

Post-conference surveys and informal feedback have indicated that SATURN attendees value the opportunity to network and to share experiences and insights with peers and colleagues each year at SATURN. In response, the program committee this year has built into the program an Open Space event, which will run concurrently with the rest of the conference. "Open spaces have no set program or agenda," says Technical Chair Michael Keeling. "The idea is that participants will bring what excites them. This can help participants make the conference what they want it to be. I expect this will be a critical part of the learning experience we have at SATURN."

We are offering a special incentive for students to attend SATURN, the SEI conference on software architecture and design topics. The Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) is a professional network of software, systems, and enterprise architects from around the world, representing industry, academia, and government. Each year the SEI sponsors the SATURN software architecture conference. SATURN 2014 will be held in Portland, Oregon, May 5-9, 2014. SATURN attracts an international audience of practicing software architects, industry thought leaders, developers, technical managers, and researchers to share ideas, insights, and experience about effective architecture-centric practices for developing and maintaining software-intensive systems. SATURN is designed for practitioners who are responsible for producing robust software architectures as well as for those who view software architecture as critical to the achievement of their business or organizational missions.

The SATURN 2014 schedule was officially published to the conference website last week. Creating the program schedule for the core conference turned out to be much more challenging than I expected. I think this was an unintended side effect of having so many great submissions. The biggest problem for me was trying to overcome the impossible task of creating a schedule where I get to see all the talks I want to see! There are just too many amazing presentations. As a conference organizer, I can tell you that this is a great problem to have.

Looking at this year's program, I truly believe that you cannot go wrong with any course of sessions that you pick. So rather than talk about the highlights as I see them (I think the entire program is awesome), allow me to share some strategies for how you might build your perfect SATURN conference experience. Again, you really can't make a bad decision, so ultimately it's all about understanding what you want to get out of the conference.

by Neil Ernst, SATURN 2014 Tutorials Chair We have a great tutorial line-up this year that I would like to share. Since tutorials at SATURN are half-day sessions, they provide the presenters time for an in-depth exploration. I think attendees of SATURN 2014 will be particularly impressed by the breadth and depth of our program. On Tuesday, May 6, we have five tutorials scheduled.

  • George Fairbanks, Google, and author of Just Enough Software Architecture, will cover “Architecture Hoisting” (T1), techniques for moving responsibility from the code to the architecture.
  • Stephany Bellomo and Rick Kazman, from the Software Engineering Institute, in Tutorial T2, will introduce deployability and DevOps techniques, then discuss architectural approaches and patterns to reduce build time and shorten the feedback cycle.
  • In the afternoon sessions, Len Bass, of Australia’s National IT Research Centre, will discuss the implications of DevOps on system design (T3). For example, how does moving to a continuous-deployment approach change how the architecture is designed and implemented? This makes a nice complement to the earlier tutorial from Bellomo and Kazman for those desiring a full menu of deployability fare.
  • Pradyumn Sharma (@PradyumnSharma) of Pragati Software will cover NoSQL databases (T4). If you’ve been hearing this term for a few years now and need to really get a good sense for the landscape, Pradyumn will cover the fundamentals for you, basing the session on real-world examples.
  • Finally on Tuesday, Eltjo Poort (@eltjopoort) of CGI will cover the CGI Risk and Cost-Driven Architecture approach (RCDA) in T5. He will discuss how CGI has used RCDA to implement lean and agile architectures in their global software business. RCDA is a recognized architecture method in The Open Group’s architect certification program.

For the first time at SATURN 2014, which will be held in Portland, Oregon, May 5-9, 2014, the SEI will offer a new one-day course titled Big Data--Architectures and Technologies. The course will be available to SATURN attendees on Tuesday, May 6 and will be taught by SEI instructors Ian Gorton and John Klein. This course is designed for architects and technical stakeholders such as product managers, development managers, and systems engineers involved in the development of big-data applications. It focuses on the relationship among application software, data models, and deployment architectures and how specific technology selection relates to all of these.

Jerome Pesenti, vice president of Watson Core Technology at IBM, will deliver the closing keynote at SATURN 2014 on Thursday, May 8. Jerome was the co-founder 13 years ago of Vivisimo, the innovative search-solutions company. Before Vivisimo, he was a visiting scientist at the Carnegie Mellon University School of Computer Science, carrying out research on document clustering, data mining, and artificial intelligence. He is a Carnegie Science Entrepreneur and Pittsburgh 40 Under 40 awardee. He is an alumnus of the �cole Normale Sup�rieure in Paris. His academic degrees consist of a BS in philosophy from the Sorbonne, an MS in cognitive science from the University of Paris VI, and an MS and PhD in pure mathematics from the University of Paris-Sud. For more information about SATURN 2014 or to register, visit the SATURN website or contact the SEI.

Jerome Pesenti

Joe Justice, of Scrum Inc., and Team Wikispeed, which built a 100+ mpg car in less than three months for the X-Prize using Agile, Lean, and Scrum, will discuss this project in a keynote address at SATURN 2014 on Wednesday, May 7. Joe is a consultant at Scrum, Inc., TEDx speaker, and coach for agile hardware and manufacturing teams around the world. He is the founder of Team WIKISPEED, an all Scrum, volunteer-based, green automotive-prototyping company, with a goal to change the world for the better. Justice consults and coaches teams and companies on implementing Scrum at all levels of their organization, in software and physical manufacturing.

Joe Justice

UPDATE: Joe provided us with the title and abstract for his talk.

Title: For Maximum Awesome

Bill Opdyke, who is best known for having done the first in-depth study of code re-factoring as a software engineering technique, will deliver the opening keynote address at SATURN 2014 on Wednesday, May 7. Bill is currently an architecture lead/vice president at JPMorgan Chase, where he focuses on architectural issues related to web and mobile retail banking. His doctoral research at the University of Illinois led to the foundational thesis in object-oriented refactoring.

Registration for the tenth annual SEI Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN ) 2013 software architecture conference is now open. SATURN 2014 will take place at the Portland Downtown Waterfront Hotel in Portland, Oregon, from May 5-9 and will feature keynote presentations by leaders in the field of software architecture:

  • Joe Justice of Scrum Inc., and Team Wikispeed, which built a 100+ mpg car in less than three months for the X-Prize using Agile, Lean, and Scrum: (see http://tedxtalks.ted.com/video/TEDxRainier-Joe-Justice-WikiSpe)
  • Jerome Pesenti, Vice President of Watson Core Technology at IBM and former co-founder of Vivisimo, the innovate search solutions company
  • Bill Opdyke, Architecture Lead (Corporate Internet Group) at J.P. Morgan Chase, who is best known for having done the first in-depth study of code re-factoring as a software engineering technique
Also participating in SATURN this year will be Diana Larsen (http://futureworksconsulting.com), who will facilitate an Open Space event that will run concurrently with the conference and provide a valuable forum for networking and sharing of ideas and solutions. Register now for the SATURN 2014 software architecture conference.

7 Secret Proposal-Writing Tips that Make Conference Program Committees go Wild!

Writing a great session proposal for a practitioners’ conference can be difficult, even for experienced public speakers and authors. Proposal writing is a distinct skill, different from writing great papers and giving amazing presentations. Since your session proposal is what the reviewers will use to decide whether your session might be a good fit for the SATURN 2014 technical program, it’s also an important skill. With the final submission deadline for SATURN 2014 quickly approaching on January 17, 2014, here are 7 tips for writing a great submission proposal.

Jeromy Carriere of Google, member of the SATURN 2014 Program Committee and previously featured speaker at SATURN, dug through presentations from previous years at SATURN and put together a list of some he found valuable:

Invited talk: Games Software Architects Play (Phillippe Kruchten) "The life of a software architect is a long (and sometimes painful) succession of suboptimal decisions made partially in the dark." Phillippe takes us on a tour of some of the ways that we make bad decisions: cognitive biases, reasoning fallacies, political games. Sadly, each example resonates with me, and not just because I've seen them in other people. Architects have to rely on intuition, but we also need to know when and how it fails us.

Thanks to the great community participation we had at SATURN 2013 in Minneapolis this year, we are able to keep SATURN affordable in 2014. As in 2013, we will have three registration periods for SATURN, priced as follows:

  • Super-early-bird (early February through mid-March): $750
  • Early-bird (mid-March through early April): $850
  • Regular: $1100

One of our goals every year with SATURN is to create a solid technical program that is informative, engaging, and lasting. When evaluating proposals for the program, the review committee uses the following guidelines to help decide whether a proposal is a good match for this year’s conference. In these guidelines, the term “session” is used generically to describe any talks, workshops, tutorials, and so on in the conference program.

Experience reports and case studies are some of the most effective learning tools available to professional software engineers today. For decades, software engineers have improved the state of practice by sharing stories of their harrowing adventures and triumphant successes. Taking the time to share lessons from our past experiences not only helps us to avoid repeating the mistakes of the past but also spreads the most effective practices widely. This is why SATURN has included experience reports in the main conference program since the start.

While hearing about others’ experiences is important, there is only so much that you can learn by listening to others talk about what they did and what they learned. Learning from experiences of your own is an essential part of growing as a professional software engineer. This is especially true for software architecture, an area that requires a broad understanding of theory and practice.

In the introduction of The Development of Design, Gordon Glegg describes a rare and important type of explorer that is the engineering scientist.

[The engineering scientist] not only seeks knowledge but he also applies it. His duty is to the community. His success lies in the tangible, and his satisfaction springs from creating something both new and useful.

SATURN is the conference for engineering scientists who practice in the field of software architecture. Knowledge shared at SATURN is intended to be put into practice. The technical program in general is all about sharing important lessons we’ve learned when designing and building software systems.

SATURN 2014 marks the 10th Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) conference--the largest conference dedicated to software architecture in North America. Since 2003, an international audience of practicing software architects, industry thought leaders, developers, technical managers, and researchers have gathered at SATURN to share ideas, insights, and experiences about effective architecture-centric practices for developing and maintaining software-intensive systems. SATURN 2014 will take place in Portland, Oregon from May 5--May 9, 2014.

Since 2010, the SEI and IEEE have been conferring two attendee-selected awards at SATURN. The IEEE Software SATURN Architecture in Practice Presentation Award is given to the presentation that best describes experiences, methods, and lessons learned from the implementation of architecture-centric practices. Anthony Tsakiris of Ford Motor Company, Jeromy Carriere of eBay, Inc., and Michael Keeling of Vivisimo received this award in 2010, 2011, and 2012 respectively. This year's award winner was Simon Brown of Coding the Architecture for his presentation titled The Conflict Between Agile and Architecture: Myth or Reality.

Notes by Brendan Foote and Ian De Silva

IEEE Invited Talk: Games Software Architect Play: On Reasoning Fallacies, Cognitive Biases, and Politics

Phillippe Kruchten, University of British Columbia

Phillippe got exposure to large and not-so-large companies as a software architecture consultant with Rational in the early part of the century. Everywhere, he saw how design really was the same thing as making decisions, and everyone uses a process to do that.

Notes by Ian De Silva

Software Development Improvement Program: Enabling Software Excellence at a Hardware Company

Sascha Stoeter, ABB

ABB has historically been a hardware company, but it has been slowly increasing the amount of software development it does since the 80s. It is a distributed company (in 34+ countries) with software embedded into products such as controllers. Each team has its own set of tools to support development efforts.

Notes by Ian De Silva

Lean and Mean Architecting with Risk- and Cost- Driven Architecture

Eltjo Poort, CGI
Solution architecture includes more than just the software; it may include business processes, information systems, technologies, and the environment. Solution architecture approaches fill the gap between enterprise architecture approaches and technical architecture approaches. Enterprise approaches are weak on transformation and implementation, while technical architecture is weak on cross-technology stakeholder concerns.

Notes by Brendan Foote

All Architecture Evaluation Is Not the Same: Lessons Learned from More Than 50 Architecture Evaluations in Industry
Matthias Naab, Jens Knodel, and Thorsten Keuler, Fraunhofer IESE
Matthias has evaluated many systems' architecture, ranging from tens of thousands of lines of code to tens of millions, and primarily in Java, C++ and C#. From this he distills out commonalities in the various stages of the evaluations. To start with, the initiator of the evaluation was either the development company or an outside company, such as a current customer or a potential one. The questions being asked also varied--whether wondering if the architecture is adequate for one's solutions, what the impact would be of changing the system's paradigm, or how big a difference there was between a system and the reference architecture.

Notes by Brendan Foote

Keynote Address: Learning to Surf

Mary Poppendieck, Poppendieck.LLC

We've always had to ability to think in different ways by pretending to "stand in someone else's shoes." But without even trying, we are using two different modes of thinking: type 1, the fast, reflexive, intuitive mode; and type 2, which is slow and thoughtful.

Notes by Frank M. Rischner

Architecture Patterns for Mobile Systems in Resource-Constrained Environments
Grace Lewis, Jeff Boleng, Gene Cahill, Edwin Morris, Marc Novakouski, James Root, and Soumya Simanta, SEI

First responders, soldiers, and other front-line personnel work in resource-constrained environments. It is necessary to use mobile systems in those environments. The systems are limited in performance and battery life. This talk is about architectural patterns. The first pattern Lewis talked about is the Data Source Integration Pattern, which means the data source is on the server. Some of the operations on the data are very power consuming, so we don't want them on the mobile device. The user defines the filters on the mobile device and sends them to the server. The second pattern is the Group Context Awareness Pattern. The users don't go out in the field alone. The users' devices are connected to the same controller, so all devices show the same view. Since the users are not in the field alone and probably operate in a close area, only one device needs the GPS has to be turned on. This model is a layered MVC pattern. Rule sets apply to the mission and are interchangeable. The third pattern is the Cloudlet-Based Cyber-Foraging Pattern. Cyber-foraging has been around for a while; the most known application is probably Siri from Apple. The Cloudlet-Based Cyber-Foraging base is on a VM manager.

Notes by Frank M. Rischner

The Design Space of Modern HTML5/JavaScript Web Applications

Marcin Nowak and Cesare Pautasso, University of Lugano
Whenever we create a web application, we have to decide where the application runs, either on the server side or on the client side. When using HTML5, we push everything but the data to the client. In the example scenario, the server is treated as the database, and the browser is seen as a terminal. There are several Model View interaction patterns: Model View Controller Pattern, Model View Presenter Pattern, and Model View ViewModel Pattern, which is the most flexible one of the patterns. Most recent movements apply the "Model View *" pattern, which leaves out the controller.

Notes by Ian De Silva

The Conflict Between Agile and Architecture: Myth or Reality?

Simon Brown, Coding the Architecture

Agile is about working in small increments, getting feedback, and improving the process or product. Architecture is about structure and vision. There is no conflict between agile and architecture because every software project has an architecture. There is, however, a conflict in the approach and team structure.

Notes by Ian De Silva

Introducing Agile in Large-Scale Projects

Vladimir Koncar, Ericsson Nikola Tesla Drago Holub, Ericsson Nikola Tesla Zoran Kokolj, Ericsson Nikola Tesla Emina Filipovic-Juric, Ericsson Nikola Tesla Josko Bilic, Ericsson Nikola Tesla
In this talk, Koncar described his team's experiences using agile on a large-scale telecom project at Ericsson. This hardware-dependent project was estimated to be about 10 million lines of code, requiring the work of 100 developers for two years. Because of hardware-plan instability, uncertain requirements, and sensitive time to market, agile was the development methodology of choice. In particular, they used Scrum with long-term, cross-functional teams.

Notes by Brendan Foote

How to Build, Implement, and Use an Architecture Metamodel

Chris Armstrong, Armstrong Process Group, Inc.
Armstrong discussed the architecture-description standard UML model, showing how an architecture description expresses an architecture, fulfills the concerns of stakeholders, and more. He uses the difference between raw accounting data and the common views the way, say, a CFO would need to because of the way that an architecture is standardized by the RFC 42010 (that is, what subset of the entire UML model is particularly useful?).

Notes by Frank M. Rischner, Ian De Silva, and Brendan Foote

Keynote Address: WordPress.com and the Future of Work

Scott Berkun, ScottBerkun.com
Berkun is the author of the forthcoming A Year Without Pants, a reflection on his time working as a team lead for WordPress.com, and four other books. Before that, he was a Microsoft employee and worked on Internet Explorer and Windows. He saw a lot of differences between those two working environments, which his book aims to articulate. At WordPress.com, people are distributed globally (hence, no one has to go to work or "wear pants"). They also get to meet up in cool places like Athens.

Notes by Frank M. Rischner

Architecting Long-Lived Systems

Harald Wesenberg and Einar Landre, Statoil Arne Wiklund, Kongsberg

Statoil uses environmental-monitoring software for monitoring the impacts of their oil business on the environment. Statoil struggled to build a system that would live for a long time. Making sure there is no impact on the environment, how do we build a system that lives for 70 years and adapts to changes?

  • Don't monitor the major events like oils spills; monitor the little things and their impacts on the environment.
  • Use agile projects, since there are a huge number of unknowns in the unknowns.
  • Use stacking capabilities and business capabilities. Those business capabilities are driven by value, are measurable, and provide actions. Each capability is a small enterprise-architecture element.

Notes by Frank M. Rischner, Ian De Silva, and Brendan Foote SATURN 2013 Keynote Address: 15 Years of SOA at Credit Suisse: Lessons Learned and Remaining Challenges Stephan Murer, Credit Suisse Murer works for Credit Suisse, which finds competitive advantage in creating their own systems, rather than outsourcing that work to software vendors. The company handles a large-scale user base, with almost 67,750 users in 550 locations.

SATURN 2013 covers many topics in a variety of areas relevant to software architecture and delivering quality systems; but there might be one topic that you are passionate about that is missing. Or SATURN coverage of a topic may not be as deep as you would like, and you may want to share and learn more. This year, SATURN will provide the opportunity for you to explore topics of your choice at the Open Space on Wednesday May 2, 4:15-5:15 PM.

Got something to say about software architecture? Here is your chance! The program for SATURN 2013 includes a "Lightning Talks" session on Wednesday, May 1, 2013�at 4:15 pm. The session will be a rapid-fire series of five-minute talks on any topic related to software architecture. Do you have a story about a project success (or maybe a not-so-successful project)? A method or technique that you use? A tool that you have developed? An opinion about one of the hot technologies? A reaction to one of the earlier presentations or keynotes? This is your chance to brag, share, or just get something off your chest.

The international software architecture community has responded to this year’s SATURN technical program by setting a new attendance record for the SEI Architecture Technology User Group (SATURN) Conference. SATURN, now in its 9th year, will be held at the Marriott City Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota, from April 29 to May 3, 2013, and registration is still open. Currently 181 people are registered to attend, breaking the previous SATURN attendance record of 166 attendees in 2011.

As program chairs for SATURN 2013, we would like to provide you an overview of the presentation program (note: information about keynotes by Stephan Murer, Scott Berkun, and Mary Poppendieck, the invited talk by Philippe Kruchten, and tutorial highlights is already available in other blog posts). We received many high quality submissions covering the topics of front-end architecture, back-end architecture, methods and tools, and technical leadership. In total we got contributions from more than 40 companies and organizations across three continents.

In Felix Bachmann's tutorial at SATURN 2013 on Monday, April 29 titled Architectural Coaching, you will learn the essentials of how to successfully coach an architecture team in designing a software system that fulfills what the stakeholders want within the given constraints, such as budget and time. You will learn about the importance of a product vision, the architecting process, and the soft skills required to lead a successful team. In group exercises, you will work with a team to produce the product vision, which gives the team direction and motivation.

In his tutorial on Tuesday, April 30 at SATURN 2013 titled Pragmatic Solution Architecting with Risk- and Cost-Driven Architecture (RCDA), Eltjo Poort, lead expert on solution architecture at CGI (formerly Logica), will present a solution-architecture approach tailored to today's complex architecting environment. RCDA combines practices from enterprise and software architecture. Its risk-and-cost focus centers the approach on concrete drivers and helps teams to explain their architectural choices to managers and other business stakeholders in terms that they can understand.

For the next 48 hours, the updated edition of SATURN 2013 Keynote Speaker Scott Berkun's popular book of essays, Mindfire: Big Ideas for Curious Minds is available for free for download in all ebook editions. This 1.1 edition has more than 100 minor corrections, typo fixes, and little polishes making it the best version ever of this collection of Berkun's writings over the last decade. At SATURN, Berkun will speak at 1:15 pm on Wednesday, May 1 on WordPress.com and the Future of Work. Download Mindfire now.

SATURN 2013 is only a month and a half away, and the deadline for registering for the reduced early-bird rate is April 1. If you are an experienced or aspiring practitioner or technical consultant and have seen the technical program, list of courses and tutorials, and descriptions of the keynotes and plenary talks, chances are that you found something on the program that would be relevant to your interests and concerns.

But if you still haven't registered to attend SATURN, you probably have good reasons for hesitating. You may be having difficulty convincing the people who approve your travel requests that the benefits you will derive from attending will outweigh the costs of travel, conference fees, and perhaps most importantly, time away from the office-time during which you will not generate any billable hours or be able to contribute to important projects. Why, then, do we think that you should consider registering for SATURN despite your good reasons for hesitating?

If you are a practicing or aspiring software architect, the SEI Software Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) 2013 Conference offers courses, presentations, tutorials, and talks providing technical advice and knowledge around four architectural themes:

  • Front-end architectures: impact of living on the edge
  • Back-end architectures and application hosting: go to the cloud or stay on the ground?
  • Methods and tools: go with the flow or go your own way?
  • Technical leadership: hard skills and soft skills
SATURN 2013 will be held in Minneapolis, Minnesota, April 29 through May 3, 2013. Register for the SATURN software architecture conference before March 10 at� to save $300 off the regular registration fee. SATURN will feature thought-provoking and inspiring keynote and invited talks from leaders in the fields of software architecture and software development:

As the tutorial chair for SATURN 2013, I would like to share with you some of the exciting highlights from our tutorial program this year. You will want to make plans to stay all week. We start off the week with a series of very strong tutorials wrapping up the week Friday with tutorials from two of our featured conference speakers, Mary Poppendieck and Phillipe Kruchten. Our selection of 10 tutorials covers the spectrum of conference topics including software design, backend integration/application hosting, methods and tools, and technical leadership.

The tutorial program starts on Monday afternoon with an introduction to principles and patterns of RESTful web services (T1) and a practical guide to techniques and behaviors that will help you to successfully coach an architecture team (T2). Tuesday begins with an overview of a risk- and cost-driven architecture approach (T3) and a pattern-driven approach to architecture recovery and discovery (T4). Tuesday afternoon we continue with a tutorial on the key concepts of NoSQL databases from an architect's perspective (T5) and a simple approach for developing software architecture diagrams (sketches) given by Simon Brown (T6).

Philippe Kruchten will deliver an invited talk at the SATURN 2013 software architecture conference, which will be held at the Marriott City Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota April 29 through May 3, 2013.

Philippe Kruchten has been a software architect for 35 years, first at Alcatel and then at Rational Software (now IBM), working mostly on large technical systems in telecommunication, aerospace, defense, and transportation. In 2004 he became a professor of software engineering at the University of British Columbia, in Vancouver, where he teaches software project management and entrepreneurship and conducts research on software processes--what does it really mean to be agile?--and on software architecture, including architecture knowledge management, technical debt, and complexity. He is the founder of Agile Vancouver, a senior member of the IEEE Computer Society, and a professional engineer in Canada. He has given presentations and tutorials all over the world, including Agile Conferences, Scrum Gatherings, the Java and Object Orientation Conference, and the International Conference on Software Engineering. See more at http://philippe.kruchten.com.

Author Scott Berkun will deliver a keynote address at the SATURN 2013 software architecture conference, which will be held at the Marriott City Centerin Minneapolis, Minnesota April 29 through May 3, 2013.

Berkun is the best-selling author of Making Things Happen, The Myths of Innovation, Confessions of a Public Speaker, and Mindfire: Big Ideas for Curious Minds. He worked at Microsoft from 1994 to 2003 on Internet Explorer 1.0 to 5.0, Windows, and MSN, and as team lead at WordPress.com from 2010 to 2012. He now works full time as an author and speaker.

Registration for the ninth annual SEI Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN ) 2013 software architecture conference is now open. SATURN 2013 will take place at the Marriott City Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota, from April 29-May 3 and will feature three keynote presentations by leaders in the field of software architecture and project management, including Mary Poppendieck, Scott Berkun, and Stephan Murer; and a special invited talk by Philippe Kruchten. Register now for the SATURN 2013 software architecture conference.

Here is the fourth and final installment in our series of blog posts at the SEI blog that provides lightly edited transcripts of remarks by SATURN 2012 panelists on the theme of “Reflections on 20 Years of Software Architecture.” The session was moderated by Rick Kazman of the SEI, and panelists were Linda Northrop of the SEI, Doug Schmidt of Vanderbilt University, Ian Gorton of Pacific Northwest National Lab, Robert Schwanke of Siemens Corporate Research, and Jeromy Carriere. Read the post, Reflections in Software Architecture: Presentations by Jeromy Carriere & Ian Gorton.

Mary Poppendieck, award-winning author and expert on Lean software development, will deliver a keynote address at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute's annual software architecture conference. The SEI Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) 2013 Conference, which will be held April 29 through May 3, 2013, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, will feature three keynote addresses by leaders in the field of software architecture. Here is a press release announcing Mary Poppendieck's keynote address at SATURN.

Mary Poppendieck

Here is the third in our series of blog posts at the SEI blog that provides lightly edited transcripts of remarks by SATURN 2012 panelists on the theme of “Reflections on 20 Years of Software Architecture.” The session was moderated by Rick Kazman of the SEI, and panelists were Linda Northrop of the SEI, Doug Schmidt of Vanderbilt University, Ian Gorton of Pacific Northwest National Lab, Robert Schwanke of Siemens Corporate Research, and Jeromy Carriere of X.commerce/eBay. Read the third in the series, Reflections on 20 Years of Software Architecture: A Presentation by Robert Schwanke, who reflected on four general problems in software architecture: modularity, systems of systems, maintainable architecture descriptions, and system architecture.