Category: Quality Attribute Analysis

As the field of software architecture has matured over the years, its concepts and terminology can be barriers to newcomers. In past years, the SATURN program was geared toward those who had attended SEI courses or had otherwise steeped themselves in the canon (a pretty hefty bookshelf). For those who had not yet done so, the SEI offered its introductory courses before the conference began.

This year, at no additional cost, the SATURN 2015 technical program includes a series of sessions intended for beginners, novices, and aspiring software architects. This Architecture Boot Camp will be held early in the conference program and led by experienced instructors from the SEI technical staff. You don't have to attend every Boot Camp session, and you can interleave them with the main schedule.

by Anthony Tsakiris Ford Motor Company Architecture development activities as presented in books, articles, and classes are sometimes “heavy” – that is, they require a lot of time and people resources relative to what is available. That’s my view from an automotive embedded-control-systems environment. An argument can be made that that’s what it takes, but there’s another reality that time and resources are truly in short supply. It’s difficult to get stakeholders who are busy with multiple projects and production concerns to commit big chunks of their time to an activity like a Quality Attribute Workshop for a new project.

Notes by Ziyad Alsaeed, edited by Tamara Marshall-Keim Can You Hear Me Now? The Art of Applying Communication Protocols When Architecting Real-Time Control Systems Todd Farley, BAE Systems, Inc. BAE Systems deals with architecting real-time control systems. These systems are usually complicated and distributed. Also, the lifetimes of projects are usually very long. So BAE must always answer this question: Which process should they adapt? The problems they face tend to fall into three categories:

  • motion control systems (~robots)
  • computation-intensive algorithms
  • user interfaces

by Neil Ernst, SATURN 2014 Tutorials Chair We have a great tutorial line-up this year that I would like to share. Since tutorials at SATURN are half-day sessions, they provide the presenters time for an in-depth exploration. I think attendees of SATURN 2014 will be particularly impressed by the breadth and depth of our program. On Tuesday, May 6, we have five tutorials scheduled.

  • George Fairbanks, Google, and author of Just Enough Software Architecture, will cover “Architecture Hoisting” (T1), techniques for moving responsibility from the code to the architecture.
  • Stephany Bellomo and Rick Kazman, from the Software Engineering Institute, in Tutorial T2, will introduce deployability and DevOps techniques, then discuss architectural approaches and patterns to reduce build time and shorten the feedback cycle.
  • In the afternoon sessions, Len Bass, of Australia’s National IT Research Centre, will discuss the implications of DevOps on system design (T3). For example, how does moving to a continuous-deployment approach change how the architecture is designed and implemented? This makes a nice complement to the earlier tutorial from Bellomo and Kazman for those desiring a full menu of deployability fare.
  • Pradyumn Sharma (@PradyumnSharma) of Pragati Software will cover NoSQL databases (T4). If you’ve been hearing this term for a few years now and need to really get a good sense for the landscape, Pradyumn will cover the fundamentals for you, basing the session on real-world examples.
  • Finally on Tuesday, Eltjo Poort (@eltjopoort) of CGI will cover the CGI Risk and Cost-Driven Architecture approach (RCDA) in T5. He will discuss how CGI has used RCDA to implement lean and agile architectures in their global software business. RCDA is a recognized architecture method in The Open Group’s architect certification program.

For the first time at SATURN 2014, which will be held in Portland, Oregon, May 5-9, 2014, the SEI will offer a new one-day course titled Big Data--Architectures and Technologies. The course will be available to SATURN attendees on Tuesday, May 6 and will be taught by SEI instructors Ian Gorton and John Klein. This course is designed for architects and technical stakeholders such as product managers, development managers, and systems engineers involved in the development of big-data applications. It focuses on the relationship among application software, data models, and deployment architectures and how specific technology selection relates to all of these.

From May 19–26 2013, many SEI staff members participated in the International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE), the premiere venue for research in software engineering. The conference was in its 35th year, and ran over seven days in downtown San Francisco. You can find post-conference materials here, or here. This blog post discusses some of the activities of SEI staff in the Architecture Practices initiative. ICSE is a great opportunity for SEI technical staff to present emerging results, listen to other researchers, engage with industry practitioners, and continue the SEI’s leading role in the software engineering research community.

This September, the SEI will be coming to Los Angeles to offer two onsite professional development courses, Documenting Software Architectures and Software Architecture Design and Analysis. Successful completion of these two courses fulfills two of the four requirements toward the SEI Software Architecture Professional Certificate, which can help you gain the skills and acquire the experience to enhance your career.

Notes by Ian De Silva

Software Development Improvement Program: Enabling Software Excellence at a Hardware Company

Sascha Stoeter, ABB

ABB has historically been a hardware company, but it has been slowly increasing the amount of software development it does since the 80s. It is a distributed company (in 34+ countries) with software embedded into products such as controllers. Each team has its own set of tools to support development efforts.

As program chairs for SATURN 2013, we would like to provide you an overview of the presentation program (note: information about keynotes by Stephan Murer, Scott Berkun, and Mary Poppendieck, the invited talk by Philippe Kruchten, and tutorial highlights is already available in other blog posts). We received many high quality submissions covering the topics of front-end architecture, back-end architecture, methods and tools, and technical leadership. In total we got contributions from more than 40 companies and organizations across three continents.

If you are a practicing or aspiring software architect, the SEI Software Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) 2013 Conference offers courses, presentations, tutorials, and talks providing technical advice and knowledge around four architectural themes:

  • Front-end architectures: impact of living on the edge
  • Back-end architectures and application hosting: go to the cloud or stay on the ground?
  • Methods and tools: go with the flow or go your own way?
  • Technical leadership: hard skills and soft skills
SATURN 2013 will be held in Minneapolis, Minnesota, April 29 through May 3, 2013. Register for the SATURN software architecture conference before March 10 at� to save $300 off the regular registration fee. SATURN will feature thought-provoking and inspiring keynote and invited talks from leaders in the fields of software architecture and software development:

Here is the fourth and final installment in our series of blog posts at the SEI blog that provides lightly edited transcripts of remarks by SATURN 2012 panelists on the theme of “Reflections on 20 Years of Software Architecture.” The session was moderated by Rick Kazman of the SEI, and panelists were Linda Northrop of the SEI, Doug Schmidt of Vanderbilt University, Ian Gorton of Pacific Northwest National Lab, Robert Schwanke of Siemens Corporate Research, and Jeromy Carriere. Read the post, Reflections in Software Architecture: Presentations by Jeromy Carriere & Ian Gorton.

Important Dates

Paper Submission: February 7, 2013 Acceptance Notification: February 28, 2013 Camera-Ready Copy: March 7, 2013

Background

Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) and service-oriented systems, which are built using the SOA paradigm, are now in the stage of widespread adoption, at least according to Gartner's Hype Cycle of Emerging Technologies. Due to the fact that some of the standards for service integration have stabilized, and driven by IT cost savings, organizations are starting to incorporate external software services into their systems, some of which are hosted in the cloud. From a provider perspective, many commercial companies such as Oracle, SAP, Intuit, and Netflix either have cloud-based offerings of their products or run their business completely in the cloud. The special theme of the 5th edition of the PESOS workshop is "Service Engineering for the Cloud." Cloud Computing is shaping the way that organizations acquire and use systems — software-as-a-service (SaaS) model — and how they develop and deploy systems — platform-as-a-service (PaaS) and infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) models. Even though cloud platforms and infrastructures are typically designed to scale on demand, the question is whether this automatic elasticity translates to all services deployed on them.