Category: From the Trenches

As the pace of software delivery increases, organizations need guidance on how to deliver high-quality software rapidly, while simultaneously meeting demands related to time to market, cost, productivity, and quality. In practice, demands for adding new features or fixing defects often take priority. However, when software developers are guided solely by project-management measures, such as progress on requirements and defect counts, they ignore the impact of architectural dependencies, which can impede the progress of a project if not properly managed. This blog post at the SEI blog by Rod Nord and Ipek Ozkaya of the SEI describes a first step toward an approach they developed that aims to use qualitative architectural measures to better inform quantitative code-quality metrics.

Architecture Practices for Agile at Scale: Strategically Managing Technical Debt to Improve System Quality

The Cyber Security and Information Systems Information Analysis Center (CSIAC) invites you to attend this webinar. This event requires registration. Presenter: Robert L. Nord Date and Time: Wednesday, December 11th, 2013; 12-1 pm EDT Registration Required Practices designed to expedite system delivery, such as prototyping or agile development, can paradoxically lead to unexpected rework costs that ultimately slow down later deliverables and degrade value over time, especially as the scale of the system grows. The term "technical debt" describes an aspect of this tradeoff between short-term and long-term value in the software development cycle.

Fifth International Workshop on Managing Technical Debt Co-located with Empirical Software Engineering International Week (ESEIW 2013) Baltimore, Maryland October 9, 2013 http://www.sei.cmu.edu/community/td2013esem/The technical debt metaphor is gaining significant traction in the development community as a way to understand and communicate the issues surrounding the delivery of increasingly complex software-reliant systems that demands better ways to manage the long-term effects of short-term expedients. However,

"...there is a plethora of attention-grabbing pronouncements in cyberspace that have not been evaluated before they were published, often reflecting the authors' guesses and experience on the subject of Technical Debt." - Spinola et al. 2013

Fourth International Workshop on Managing Technical Debt at ICSE 2013 San Francisco, California, May 20, 2013 Invited Speaker: Steve McConnell http://www.sei.cmu.edu/community/td2013/ On May 20, 2013, we will be conducting a workshop in conjunction with the International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE 2013) in San Francisco to scrutinize the diverse issues that are related to technical debt and the software development lifecycle.

Fourth International Workshop on Managing Technical Debt at ICSE 2013 San Francisco, California, May 20, 2013 Submission deadline: February 7, 2013 http://www.sei.cmu.edu/community/td2013/ The submission deadline for the Fourth International Workshop on Managing Technical Debtis fast approaching on February 7. We just learned that Steve McConnell, expert on technical debt, accepted our offer to be a featured speaker at the workshop.

Mary Poppendieck, award-winning author and expert on Lean software development, will deliver a keynote address at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute's annual software architecture conference. The SEI Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) 2013 Conference, which will be held April 29 through May 3, 2013, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, will feature three keynote addresses by leaders in the field of software architecture. Here is a press release announcing Mary Poppendieck's keynote address at SATURN.

Mary Poppendieck

Fourth International Workshop on Managing Technical Debt at ICSE 2013 San Francisco, California, May 20, 2013 Submission deadline: February 7, 2013 http://www.sei.cmu.edu/community/td2013/ On May 20, 2013, we will be organizing a workshop in conjunction with the International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE 2013) in San Francisco to scrutinize the diverse issues that are related to technical debt and the software development lifecycle. We invite practitioners and researchers to join us in discussing early findings, future directions, experiences, and results. We are seeking papers on practical experience with technical debt, and approaches to evaluate and manage technical debt. The details of the call for papers and other logistics are at our workshop site.