Archive: 2015-05

On Monday, April 27, before the start of SATURN 2015, a small group of 16 software engineers met to explore ideas around the emerging microservices architecture trend. Microservices have seen a rapid rise in popularity over the past year or so, and we thought it would make an interesting topic of discussion. Sam Newman's book covers significant ground and yet there there are still many nuances that we don't fully understand.

We were honored to have Gregor Hohpe, chief IT architect at Allianz, as one of our three keynote speakers this year at SATURN. In fact, we have been trying for several years to persuade Gregor to speak for us; this was the first time we succeeded.

Gregor has kindly posted his impressions of SATURN 2015 to his blog, and I urge you to read them. SATURN, writes Gregor, is "an amazing event [that is] a perfect blend of structured thinking from the academic edge combined with valuable industry experience."

Many thanks to Gregor for his contributions to SATURN 2015 and his great blog post.

Bill Pollak
SATURN 2015 General Chair

Since 2010, the SEI and IEEE have been conferring two attendee-selected awards at SATURN. The IEEE Software SATURN Architecture in Practice Presentation Award is given to the presentation that best describes experiences, methods, and lessons learned from the implementation of architecture-centric practices. This year's award winners were Jochem Schulenklopper and Eelco Rommes of inspearit for their presentation titled Why They Just Don't Get It: Communicating Architecture to Business Stakeholders.

Mark Schwartz, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Schwartz discussed some projects that he has led and lessons learned from the experiences in building systems for the government. He is CIO of one of three agencies that deal with immigration. USCIS processes 7 million applications per year for green cards, refugee status, citizenship, and other cases. USCIS is part of the Department of Homeland Security, which is important because the agency is under two tiers of enterprise architecture, and everybody wants to tell everybody else what to do. USCIS manages about 70 legacy IT systems, and Schwartz discussed three new projects.

Marisa Sanchez, Independent Consultant Sanchez works in the arena of large-scale technology change and facilitated a participatory session on how to engage your most critical stakeholders to support your project. Her stakeholder engagement framework has three steps:

(1) identify stakeholders,

(2) analyze stakeholders, and

(3) develop engagement strategies.

Jungwoo Ryoo, Pennsylvania State University, and Rick Kazman, University of Hawaii and Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute

by Jacob Tate, Mount St. Mary's University

In his talk titled "Architectural Analysis for Security (AAFS)," Jungwoo Ryoo explained that there is an absence of security practices in software architecture. His research concerns developing and implementing a methodology to test and secure software systems starting at the design phase. The architectural analysis is basically a structured way of discovering these security issues. It has frequently been common to implement methods like this after the design of the system, and Dr. Ryoo warned against this.

Amine Chigani and Yun Freund, GE Software

At GE, software is a horizontal capability in the company, with over 14,000 software professionals in the business. GE Software is launching the Predix™ platform, which will be a common theme across all of GE's industries, and the company will make this platform available to the world later this year.

Jeromy Carriere, Rick Buskens, and Jack Greenfield, Google
Evolving Mission-Critical "Legacy" Systems, Rick Buskens

Buskens's team is a multisite team that works on a suite of projects focused on Google's internal structure, while others are external-facing and cloud. The infrastructure for running services at Google is built on Borg, a cluster-management system that runs hundreds of thousands of jobs across thousands of applications in clusters of tens of thousands of machines. Borg is an internal cloud infrastructure, whose users have many different needs; a service configuration specification called BCL (Borg Configuration Language) allows users to tell Borg what those needs are. Buskens's team works on Borg Config, which interprets the service configuration for Borg; it manages the millions of jobs running each day. BorgCron works for scheduled and repeated tasks at Google scale.