Archive: 2014-08

Wearable Computing Wearable computing is coming to the masses in the forms of fitness, gaming, and medical devices while non-consumer markets such as defense and aerospace continue to push for advanced wearable technologies to enhance safety, mobility, and efficiency in places most people will never go. Here are some recent examples of the state-of-the-art technology in wearable computing and then some that, with a little tech-know-how, you can make at home: Intel Battles Parkinson’s Disease with Big Data and Wearable Tech: Mike Wheatley at Silicon Angle describes a new project at Intel, in which a Big Data analytics platform combined with a wearable device will produce a better record of symptoms experienced by Parkinson’s patients . The Inside Story of the Oculus Rift: Peter Rubin at Wired reports that, with the Rift, Oculus hacks the visual cortex to make a virtual-reality headset that doesn’t cause “cold sweat syndrome.” The Cardboard Project: Google Developers show how you can build your own basic VR headset with a smartphone and some basic items that you can get at the hardware store. Raspberry Pi GPS Helmet Cam: Martin O’Hanlon at Stuff About Code used his Raspberry Pi­-based car cam to develop a helmet cam, takes it snowboarding, and record data about speed, altitude, and temperature.  

Test-Driven Development: Dead or Alive? Back in the Spring, a single blog post sparked a debate that on the surface seems absurd. Is TDD actually useful and still relevant? The discourse that followed and is still following this discussion is spectacular and spans Twitter, blogs, and a series of video debates. We thank Michael Keeling of Never Let Down for bringing this debate to our attention. TDD is dead. Long live testing.: David Heinemeier Hansson, the creator of Ruby on Rails, discusses the death of test-driven development and the need to transition from unit testing to system testing. Is TDD Dead?: Martin Fowler engages Hansson and Kent Beck in a series of video conversations on the topic of test-driven development and its impact on software design, including confidence, test-induced design damage, and cost.

by Rey Hernandez Sony Network Entertainment International @DeveloperRey Many times in a project, software or otherwise, the people working on the project become so entrenched in the methods they find familiar that they allow roadblocks to get in the way of project completion. All too often those roadblocks lead to missed deadlines, cut corners, general reduction in team morale, and ultimately a product that does not meet customer expectations. In his keynote at SATURN 2014, Joe Justice of Team Wikispeed and Scrum Inc., treated us to a refreshing view of project management that illustrates how teams can be extremely productive, with high morale, and great customer satisfaction.