Archive: 2013-01

As the pace of software delivery increases, organizations need guidance on how to deliver high-quality software rapidly, while simultaneously meeting demands related to time to market, cost, productivity, and quality. In practice, demands for adding new features or fixing defects often take priority. However, when software developers are guided solely by project-management measures, such as progress on requirements and defect counts, they ignore the impact of architectural dependencies, which can impede the progress of a project if not properly managed. This blog post at the SEI blog by Rod Nord and Ipek Ozkaya of the SEI describes a first step toward an approach they developed that aims to use qualitative architectural measures to better inform quantitative code-quality metrics.

7 Secret Proposal-Writing Tips that Make Conference Program Committees go Wild!

Writing a great session proposal for a practitioners’ conference can be difficult, even for experienced public speakers and authors. Proposal writing is a distinct skill, different from writing great papers and giving amazing presentations. Since your session proposal is what the reviewers will use to decide whether your session might be a good fit for the SATURN 2014 technical program, it’s also an important skill. With the final submission deadline for SATURN 2014 quickly approaching on January 17, 2014, here are 7 tips for writing a great submission proposal.

Jeromy Carriere of Google, member of the SATURN 2014 Program Committee and previously featured speaker at SATURN, dug through presentations from previous years at SATURN and put together a list of some he found valuable:

Invited talk: Games Software Architects Play (Phillippe Kruchten) "The life of a software architect is a long (and sometimes painful) succession of suboptimal decisions made partially in the dark." Phillippe takes us on a tour of some of the ways that we make bad decisions: cognitive biases, reasoning fallacies, political games. Sadly, each example resonates with me, and not just because I've seen them in other people. Architects have to rely on intuition, but we also need to know when and how it fails us.

Architecture Practices for Agile at Scale: Strategically Managing Technical Debt to Improve System Quality

The Cyber Security and Information Systems Information Analysis Center (CSIAC) invites you to attend this webinar. This event requires registration. Presenter: Robert L. Nord Date and Time: Wednesday, December 11th, 2013; 12-1 pm EDT Registration Required Practices designed to expedite system delivery, such as prototyping or agile development, can paradoxically lead to unexpected rework costs that ultimately slow down later deliverables and degrade value over time, especially as the scale of the system grows. The term "technical debt" describes an aspect of this tradeoff between short-term and long-term value in the software development cycle.

Thanks to the great community participation we had at SATURN 2013 in Minneapolis this year, we are able to keep SATURN affordable in 2014. As in 2013, we will have three registration periods for SATURN, priced as follows:

  • Super-early-bird (early February through mid-March): $750
  • Early-bird (mid-March through early April): $850
  • Regular: $1100

One of our goals every year with SATURN is to create a solid technical program that is informative, engaging, and lasting. When evaluating proposals for the program, the review committee uses the following guidelines to help decide whether a proposal is a good match for this year’s conference. In these guidelines, the term “session” is used generically to describe any talks, workshops, tutorials, and so on in the conference program.

Experience reports and case studies are some of the most effective learning tools available to professional software engineers today. For decades, software engineers have improved the state of practice by sharing stories of their harrowing adventures and triumphant successes. Taking the time to share lessons from our past experiences not only helps us to avoid repeating the mistakes of the past but also spreads the most effective practices widely. This is why SATURN has included experience reports in the main conference program since the start.

While hearing about others’ experiences is important, there is only so much that you can learn by listening to others talk about what they did and what they learned. Learning from experiences of your own is an essential part of growing as a professional software engineer. This is especially true for software architecture, an area that requires a broad understanding of theory and practice.

Everyone can be part of the mobile adventure!

Visit our website for more details:

http://www.sigsoft.org/mobilesoft2014
1st ACM International Conference on Mobile Software Engineering and Systems (MobileSoft 2014) June 2-3, 2014 Hyderabad, India Co-located with ICSE 2014 May 31- June 7, 2014 (http://2014.icse-conferences.org)

First International Workshop on Software Architecture Metrics at WICSA 2014 Sydney, Australia, April 7, 2014 Submission deadline: January 12, 2014 http://www.sei.cmu.edu/community/sam2014/ Architecting complex software systems faces the challenge of how best to assess the achievement of quality attributes and other key drivers, how to reveal issues and risks early, and how to make decisions on architecture improvement. Software architecture quality has a large impact on this effort but is usually not assessed with quantitative measures. As the pace of software delivery and technology churn increases, organizations need guidance on how to meet business goals of their software. There is an increasing need to provide ongoing insights into the quality of the system being developed.

In the introduction of The Development of Design, Gordon Glegg describes a rare and important type of explorer that is the engineering scientist.

[The engineering scientist] not only seeks knowledge but he also applies it. His duty is to the community. His success lies in the tangible, and his satisfaction springs from creating something both new and useful.

SATURN is the conference for engineering scientists who practice in the field of software architecture. Knowledge shared at SATURN is intended to be put into practice. The technical program in general is all about sharing important lessons we’ve learned when designing and building software systems.

Mobile apps and smartphones are only one instance of today’s mobile computing technology
From a systems and software architecture perspective, mobile devices and sensors are being integrated into IT solutions and re-shaping the way that systems are built. We call these systems mobile-enabled systems. In these systems the mobile device is not simply a “unit” but rather a “node” that is part of a much larger system. The impact that mobility has on software architecture and how the software architecture research community can help address many relevant issues will be discussed in the Workshop on Architecting Mobile-enabled Systems (AMeS), thus providing new insights on the key challenges faced by architects of mobile-enabled systems. The workshop will be held in conjunction with the 11th Working IEEE/IFIP Conference on Software Architecture (WICSA 2014), April 8, 2014 in Sydney, Australia. For more information and to participate, see the Call for Papers.

SATURN 2014 marks the 10th Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) conference--the largest conference dedicated to software architecture in North America. Since 2003, an international audience of practicing software architects, industry thought leaders, developers, technical managers, and researchers have gathered at SATURN to share ideas, insights, and experiences about effective architecture-centric practices for developing and maintaining software-intensive systems. SATURN 2014 will take place in Portland, Oregon from May 5--May 9, 2014.

Fifth International Workshop on Managing Technical Debt Co-located with Empirical Software Engineering International Week (ESEIW 2013) Baltimore, Maryland October 9, 2013 http://www.sei.cmu.edu/community/td2013esem/The technical debt metaphor is gaining significant traction in the development community as a way to understand and communicate the issues surrounding the delivery of increasingly complex software-reliant systems that demands better ways to manage the long-term effects of short-term expedients. However,

"...there is a plethora of attention-grabbing pronouncements in cyberspace that have not been evaluated before they were published, often reflecting the authors' guesses and experience on the subject of Technical Debt." - Spinola et al. 2013

From May 19–26 2013, many SEI staff members participated in the International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE), the premiere venue for research in software engineering. The conference was in its 35th year, and ran over seven days in downtown San Francisco. You can find post-conference materials here, or here. This blog post discusses some of the activities of SEI staff in the Architecture Practices initiative. ICSE is a great opportunity for SEI technical staff to present emerging results, listen to other researchers, engage with industry practitioners, and continue the SEI’s leading role in the software engineering research community.

This September, the SEI will be coming to Los Angeles to offer two onsite professional development courses, Documenting Software Architectures and Software Architecture Design and Analysis. Successful completion of these two courses fulfills two of the four requirements toward the SEI Software Architecture Professional Certificate, which can help you gain the skills and acquire the experience to enhance your career.

Since 2010, the SEI and IEEE have been conferring two attendee-selected awards at SATURN. The IEEE Software SATURN Architecture in Practice Presentation Award is given to the presentation that best describes experiences, methods, and lessons learned from the implementation of architecture-centric practices. Anthony Tsakiris of Ford Motor Company, Jeromy Carriere of eBay, Inc., and Michael Keeling of Vivisimo received this award in 2010, 2011, and 2012 respectively. This year's award winner was Simon Brown of Coding the Architecture for his presentation titled The Conflict Between Agile and Architecture: Myth or Reality.

Notes by Brendan Foote and Ian De Silva

IEEE Invited Talk: Games Software Architect Play: On Reasoning Fallacies, Cognitive Biases, and Politics

Phillippe Kruchten, University of British Columbia

Phillippe got exposure to large and not-so-large companies as a software architecture consultant with Rational in the early part of the century. Everywhere, he saw how design really was the same thing as making decisions, and everyone uses a process to do that.

Notes by Ian De Silva

Software Development Improvement Program: Enabling Software Excellence at a Hardware Company

Sascha Stoeter, ABB

ABB has historically been a hardware company, but it has been slowly increasing the amount of software development it does since the 80s. It is a distributed company (in 34+ countries) with software embedded into products such as controllers. Each team has its own set of tools to support development efforts.

Notes by Ian De Silva

Lean and Mean Architecting with Risk- and Cost- Driven Architecture

Eltjo Poort, CGI
Solution architecture includes more than just the software; it may include business processes, information systems, technologies, and the environment. Solution architecture approaches fill the gap between enterprise architecture approaches and technical architecture approaches. Enterprise approaches are weak on transformation and implementation, while technical architecture is weak on cross-technology stakeholder concerns.

Notes by Brendan Foote

All Architecture Evaluation Is Not the Same: Lessons Learned from More Than 50 Architecture Evaluations in Industry
Matthias Naab, Jens Knodel, and Thorsten Keuler, Fraunhofer IESE
Matthias has evaluated many systems' architecture, ranging from tens of thousands of lines of code to tens of millions, and primarily in Java, C++ and C#. From this he distills out commonalities in the various stages of the evaluations. To start with, the initiator of the evaluation was either the development company or an outside company, such as a current customer or a potential one. The questions being asked also varied--whether wondering if the architecture is adequate for one's solutions, what the impact would be of changing the system's paradigm, or how big a difference there was between a system and the reference architecture.

Notes by Brendan Foote

Keynote Address: Learning to Surf

Mary Poppendieck, Poppendieck.LLC

We've always had to ability to think in different ways by pretending to "stand in someone else's shoes." But without even trying, we are using two different modes of thinking: type 1, the fast, reflexive, intuitive mode; and type 2, which is slow and thoughtful.

Notes by Frank M. Rischner

Architecture Patterns for Mobile Systems in Resource-Constrained Environments
Grace Lewis, Jeff Boleng, Gene Cahill, Edwin Morris, Marc Novakouski, James Root, and Soumya Simanta, SEI

First responders, soldiers, and other front-line personnel work in resource-constrained environments. It is necessary to use mobile systems in those environments. The systems are limited in performance and battery life. This talk is about architectural patterns. The first pattern Lewis talked about is the Data Source Integration Pattern, which means the data source is on the server. Some of the operations on the data are very power consuming, so we don't want them on the mobile device. The user defines the filters on the mobile device and sends them to the server. The second pattern is the Group Context Awareness Pattern. The users don't go out in the field alone. The users' devices are connected to the same controller, so all devices show the same view. Since the users are not in the field alone and probably operate in a close area, only one device needs the GPS has to be turned on. This model is a layered MVC pattern. Rule sets apply to the mission and are interchangeable. The third pattern is the Cloudlet-Based Cyber-Foraging Pattern. Cyber-foraging has been around for a while; the most known application is probably Siri from Apple. The Cloudlet-Based Cyber-Foraging base is on a VM manager.

The SEI is conducting a survey to understand more about the extent to which architectural concerns play a role in agile software development. In particular, the goal of this survey is to understand some of the existing practices used to quantify architecture. This topic is of growing importance. As successful agile techniques are applied to larger and larger projects, they require increased visibility into the architecture of the system. Your participation is important to allow the SEI to correctly characterize the nature of the problem and to understand some solutions that people have found useful.

Notes by Frank M. Rischner

The Design Space of Modern HTML5/JavaScript Web Applications

Marcin Nowak and Cesare Pautasso, University of Lugano
Whenever we create a web application, we have to decide where the application runs, either on the server side or on the client side. When using HTML5, we push everything but the data to the client. In the example scenario, the server is treated as the database, and the browser is seen as a terminal. There are several Model View interaction patterns: Model View Controller Pattern, Model View Presenter Pattern, and Model View ViewModel Pattern, which is the most flexible one of the patterns. Most recent movements apply the "Model View *" pattern, which leaves out the controller.

Notes by Ian De Silva

The Conflict Between Agile and Architecture: Myth or Reality?

Simon Brown, Coding the Architecture

Agile is about working in small increments, getting feedback, and improving the process or product. Architecture is about structure and vision. There is no conflict between agile and architecture because every software project has an architecture. There is, however, a conflict in the approach and team structure.

Notes by Ian De Silva

Introducing Agile in Large-Scale Projects

Vladimir Koncar, Ericsson Nikola Tesla Drago Holub, Ericsson Nikola Tesla Zoran Kokolj, Ericsson Nikola Tesla Emina Filipovic-Juric, Ericsson Nikola Tesla Josko Bilic, Ericsson Nikola Tesla
In this talk, Koncar described his team's experiences using agile on a large-scale telecom project at Ericsson. This hardware-dependent project was estimated to be about 10 million lines of code, requiring the work of 100 developers for two years. Because of hardware-plan instability, uncertain requirements, and sensitive time to market, agile was the development methodology of choice. In particular, they used Scrum with long-term, cross-functional teams.

Notes by Brendan Foote

Design and Analysis of Cyber-Physical Systems: AADL and Avionics Systems
Julien Delange and Peter Feiler, SEI

Architectural decisions affect nonfunctional requirements, which are critical to the safety of systems. Rework costs increase the later a defect is detected in the software development life cycle. In Delange’s experience, a $10,000 architecture-phase correction can save $3 million! These errors can be caused by mismatched assumptions in embedded software. One anecdote is a train on which the doors wouldn’t close, so the conductor stepped outside to push them closed. But the system assumes the conductor is inside, so the train automatically took off. Dual core laptops also violated many assumptions that developers had made up to that time. To put it glibly, if we can’t get iTunes right on dual core machines, how are we supposed to make safe airplanes with even more complicated hardware?

Notes by Brendan Foote

How to Build, Implement, and Use an Architecture Metamodel

Chris Armstrong, Armstrong Process Group, Inc.
Armstrong discussed the architecture-description standard UML model, showing how an architecture description expresses an architecture, fulfills the concerns of stakeholders, and more. He uses the difference between raw accounting data and the common views the way, say, a CFO would need to because of the way that an architecture is standardized by the RFC 42010 (that is, what subset of the entire UML model is particularly useful?).

Notes by Frank M. Rischner, Ian De Silva, and Brendan Foote

Keynote Address: WordPress.com and the Future of Work

Scott Berkun, ScottBerkun.com
Berkun is the author of the forthcoming A Year Without Pants, a reflection on his time working as a team lead for WordPress.com, and four other books. Before that, he was a Microsoft employee and worked on Internet Explorer and Windows. He saw a lot of differences between those two working environments, which his book aims to articulate. At WordPress.com, people are distributed globally (hence, no one has to go to work or "wear pants"). They also get to meet up in cool places like Athens.

Notes by Frank M. Rischner

Architecting Long-Lived Systems

Harald Wesenberg and Einar Landre, Statoil Arne Wiklund, Kongsberg

Statoil uses environmental-monitoring software for monitoring the impacts of their oil business on the environment. Statoil struggled to build a system that would live for a long time. Making sure there is no impact on the environment, how do we build a system that lives for 70 years and adapts to changes?

  • Don't monitor the major events like oils spills; monitor the little things and their impacts on the environment.
  • Use agile projects, since there are a huge number of unknowns in the unknowns.
  • Use stacking capabilities and business capabilities. Those business capabilities are driven by value, are measurable, and provide actions. Each capability is a small enterprise-architecture element.

Notes by Frank M. Rischner, Ian De Silva, and Brendan Foote SATURN 2013 Keynote Address: 15 Years of SOA at Credit Suisse: Lessons Learned and Remaining Challenges Stephan Murer, Credit Suisse Murer works for Credit Suisse, which finds competitive advantage in creating their own systems, rather than outsourcing that work to software vendors. The company handles a large-scale user base, with almost 67,750 users in 550 locations.

SATURN 2013 covers many topics in a variety of areas relevant to software architecture and delivering quality systems; but there might be one topic that you are passionate about that is missing. Or SATURN coverage of a topic may not be as deep as you would like, and you may want to share and learn more. This year, SATURN will provide the opportunity for you to explore topics of your choice at the Open Space on Wednesday May 2, 4:15-5:15 PM.

Got something to say about software architecture? Here is your chance! The program for SATURN 2013 includes a "Lightning Talks" session on Wednesday, May 1, 2013�at 4:15 pm. The session will be a rapid-fire series of five-minute talks on any topic related to software architecture. Do you have a story about a project success (or maybe a not-so-successful project)? A method or technique that you use? A tool that you have developed? An opinion about one of the hot technologies? A reaction to one of the earlier presentations or keynotes? This is your chance to brag, share, or just get something off your chest.

The international software architecture community has responded to this year’s SATURN technical program by setting a new attendance record for the SEI Architecture Technology User Group (SATURN) Conference. SATURN, now in its 9th year, will be held at the Marriott City Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota, from April 29 to May 3, 2013, and registration is still open. Currently 181 people are registered to attend, breaking the previous SATURN attendance record of 166 attendees in 2011.

In 2009, a popular blogger published a post entitled “SOA is Dead,” which generated extensive commentary among those who work in the field of service-oriented architecture (SOA). Many practitioners in this field completely misinterpreted the post; some read the title and just assumed that the content referenced the demise of SOA. Quite the opposite, the post was inviting people to stop thinking about SOA as a set of technologies and start embracing SOA as an approach for designing, developing, and managing distributed systems that goes beyond just the technology. Unfortunately, even though SOA is still alive and widely adopted, a belief still persists that SOA can be purchased off the shelf. This post at the SEI blog highlights recent research aimed at clarifying this misperception for architects, as well as identifying the elements that constitute a service-oriented system and the relationships between these elements.

International Workshop on the Engineering of Mobile-Enabled Systems (MOBS 2013) in conjunction with ICSE 2013, San Francisco, CA, U.S.A., May 25, 2013 http://www.sei.cmu.edu/community/mobs2013/ Registration for MOBS 2013 is open. Take advantage of early-bird rates until April 14, 2013.

Background

Mobile apps are becoming important in enterprise and mission-critical systems that make use of contextual information to optimize resource usage and drive business and operational processes. Mobile technology is also reaching people in the field across multiple domains, to help with various tasks such as speech and image recognition, natural language processing, decision making, and mission planning.

5th International Workshop on Principles of Engineering Service-Oriented Systems (PESOS 2013) in conjunction with ICSE 2013, San Francisco, CA, U.S.A. May 26, 2013 http://www.sei.cmu.edu/community/pesos2013/

Registration for PESOS 2013 is open. Take advantage of early-bird rates until April 14, 2013.

Background

Service-oriented architecture (SOA) and service-oriented systems, which are built using the SOA paradigm, are now in the stage of widespread adoption, according to Gartner’s Hype Cycle of Emerging Technologies. Influenced by the stabilizing of certain standards for service integration, and driven by IT cost savings, organizations are starting to incorporate external software services into their systems. Some of these services are hosted in the cloud. From a provider perspective, many commercial companies such as Oracle, SAP, Intuit, and Netflix either have cloud-based offerings of their products or run their businesses completely in the cloud.

As program chairs for SATURN 2013, we would like to provide you an overview of the presentation program (note: information about keynotes by Stephan Murer, Scott Berkun, and Mary Poppendieck, the invited talk by Philippe Kruchten, and tutorial highlights is already available in other blog posts). We received many high quality submissions covering the topics of front-end architecture, back-end architecture, methods and tools, and technical leadership. In total we got contributions from more than 40 companies and organizations across three continents.

In Felix Bachmann's tutorial at SATURN 2013 on Monday, April 29 titled Architectural Coaching, you will learn the essentials of how to successfully coach an architecture team in designing a software system that fulfills what the stakeholders want within the given constraints, such as budget and time. You will learn about the importance of a product vision, the architecting process, and the soft skills required to lead a successful team. In group exercises, you will work with a team to produce the product vision, which gives the team direction and motivation.

In his tutorial on Tuesday, April 30 at SATURN 2013 titled Pragmatic Solution Architecting with Risk- and Cost-Driven Architecture (RCDA), Eltjo Poort, lead expert on solution architecture at CGI (formerly Logica), will present a solution-architecture approach tailored to today's complex architecting environment. RCDA combines practices from enterprise and software architecture. Its risk-and-cost focus centers the approach on concrete drivers and helps teams to explain their architectural choices to managers and other business stakeholders in terms that they can understand.

Fourth International Workshop on Managing Technical Debt at ICSE 2013 San Francisco, California, May 20, 2013 Invited Speaker: Steve McConnell http://www.sei.cmu.edu/community/td2013/ On May 20, 2013, we will be conducting a workshop in conjunction with the International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE 2013) in San Francisco to scrutinize the diverse issues that are related to technical debt and the software development lifecycle.

For the next 48 hours, the updated edition of SATURN 2013 Keynote Speaker Scott Berkun's popular book of essays, Mindfire: Big Ideas for Curious Minds is available for free for download in all ebook editions. This 1.1 edition has more than 100 minor corrections, typo fixes, and little polishes making it the best version ever of this collection of Berkun's writings over the last decade. At SATURN, Berkun will speak at 1:15 pm on Wednesday, May 1 on WordPress.com and the Future of Work. Download Mindfire now.

When a system fails, engineers too often focus on the physical components, but pay scant attention to the software. In software-reliant systems ignoring or deemphasizing the importance of software failures can be a recipe for disaster. This blog post at the SEI Blog�is the first in a series on recent developments with the Architecture Analysis Design Language (AADL) standard. First published in 2004 by SAE International, AADL is a modeling notation that employs both a textual and graphical representation. AADL provides modeling concepts to describe the runtime architecture of application systems in terms of concurrent tasks, their interactions, and their mapping onto an execution platform.

Development organizations use AADL to conduct lightweight, rigorous, yet comparatively inexpensive analyses of critical real-time factors such as performance, dependability, security, and data integrity. Use of AADL helps alleviate mismatched assumptions between the hardware, software, and their interactions that can lead to system failures. This podcast, an interview with Julien Delange and Peter Feiler of the SEI, covers the latest developments in AADL.

SATURN 2013 is only a month and a half away, and the deadline for registering for the reduced early-bird rate is April 1. If you are an experienced or aspiring practitioner or technical consultant and have seen the technical program, list of courses and tutorials, and descriptions of the keynotes and plenary talks, chances are that you found something on the program that would be relevant to your interests and concerns.

But if you still haven't registered to attend SATURN, you probably have good reasons for hesitating. You may be having difficulty convincing the people who approve your travel requests that the benefits you will derive from attending will outweigh the costs of travel, conference fees, and perhaps most importantly, time away from the office-time during which you will not generate any billable hours or be able to contribute to important projects. Why, then, do we think that you should consider registering for SATURN despite your good reasons for hesitating?

If you are a practicing or aspiring software architect, the SEI Software Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) 2013 Conference offers courses, presentations, tutorials, and talks providing technical advice and knowledge around four architectural themes:

  • Front-end architectures: impact of living on the edge
  • Back-end architectures and application hosting: go to the cloud or stay on the ground?
  • Methods and tools: go with the flow or go your own way?
  • Technical leadership: hard skills and soft skills
SATURN 2013 will be held in Minneapolis, Minnesota, April 29 through May 3, 2013. Register for the SATURN software architecture conference before March 10 at� to save $300 off the regular registration fee. SATURN will feature thought-provoking and inspiring keynote and invited talks from leaders in the fields of software architecture and software development:

Date:February 27, 2013

(Part 1)
Time:
1:30 - 3:00 PM ET

Cost: None
Register now.

About the Tutorial
SOA is not an architecture. SOA is not a system. SOA is a way of designing systems, an approach to system development, an architectural style, a design paradigm. As an architectural style, SOA can be described in terms of components and connectors. The main components are the services, service consumers, and SOA infrastructure. The connectors are predominantly message-based document exchanges. In essence, SOA is an architectural style and an approach to software development that goes with the style. You do not "build a SOA," you "build a service-oriented system."

The SEI often works to transition mature technologies and processes to the broad software engineering community, and to accelerate the adoption and impact of software engineering improvements. In that spirit, the SEI has made all of its SOA Migration, Adoption and Reuse Technique (SMART) resources freely available. These resources comprise all the SMART training materials, processes, and artifacts. SMART is a family of techniques created by the SEI to help organizations make better decisions about service-oriented architecture (SOA) adoption. Learn more in this article about SMART on the SEI website. To download the SEI's SMART Family resources, please visit http://www.sei.cmu.edu/architecture/tools/smart/index.cfm.

As the tutorial chair for SATURN 2013, I would like to share with you some of the exciting highlights from our tutorial program this year. You will want to make plans to stay all week. We start off the week with a series of very strong tutorials wrapping up the week Friday with tutorials from two of our featured conference speakers, Mary Poppendieck and Phillipe Kruchten. Our selection of 10 tutorials covers the spectrum of conference topics including software design, backend integration/application hosting, methods and tools, and technical leadership.

The tutorial program starts on Monday afternoon with an introduction to principles and patterns of RESTful web services (T1) and a practical guide to techniques and behaviors that will help you to successfully coach an architecture team (T2). Tuesday begins with an overview of a risk- and cost-driven architecture approach (T3) and a pattern-driven approach to architecture recovery and discovery (T4). Tuesday afternoon we continue with a tutorial on the key concepts of NoSQL databases from an architect's perspective (T5) and a simple approach for developing software architecture diagrams (sketches) given by Simon Brown (T6).

Philippe Kruchten will deliver an invited talk at the SATURN 2013 software architecture conference, which will be held at the Marriott City Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota April 29 through May 3, 2013.

Philippe Kruchten has been a software architect for 35 years, first at Alcatel and then at Rational Software (now IBM), working mostly on large technical systems in telecommunication, aerospace, defense, and transportation. In 2004 he became a professor of software engineering at the University of British Columbia, in Vancouver, where he teaches software project management and entrepreneurship and conducts research on software processes--what does it really mean to be agile?--and on software architecture, including architecture knowledge management, technical debt, and complexity. He is the founder of Agile Vancouver, a senior member of the IEEE Computer Society, and a professional engineer in Canada. He has given presentations and tutorials all over the world, including Agile Conferences, Scrum Gatherings, the Java and Object Orientation Conference, and the International Conference on Software Engineering. See more at http://philippe.kruchten.com.

Author Scott Berkun will deliver a keynote address at the SATURN 2013 software architecture conference, which will be held at the Marriott City Centerin Minneapolis, Minnesota April 29 through May 3, 2013.

Berkun is the best-selling author of Making Things Happen, The Myths of Innovation, Confessions of a Public Speaker, and Mindfire: Big Ideas for Curious Minds. He worked at Microsoft from 1994 to 2003 on Internet Explorer 1.0 to 5.0, Windows, and MSN, and as team lead at WordPress.com from 2010 to 2012. He now works full time as an author and speaker.

Registration for the ninth annual SEI Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN ) 2013 software architecture conference is now open. SATURN 2013 will take place at the Marriott City Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota, from April 29-May 3 and will feature three keynote presentations by leaders in the field of software architecture and project management, including Mary Poppendieck, Scott Berkun, and Stephan Murer; and a special invited talk by Philippe Kruchten. Register now for the SATURN 2013 software architecture conference.

Fourth International Workshop on Managing Technical Debt at ICSE 2013 San Francisco, California, May 20, 2013 Submission deadline: February 7, 2013 http://www.sei.cmu.edu/community/td2013/ The submission deadline for the Fourth International Workshop on Managing Technical Debtis fast approaching on February 7. We just learned that Steve McConnell, expert on technical debt, accepted our offer to be a featured speaker at the workshop.

Here is the fourth and final installment in our series of blog posts at the SEI blog that provides lightly edited transcripts of remarks by SATURN 2012 panelists on the theme of “Reflections on 20 Years of Software Architecture.” The session was moderated by Rick Kazman of the SEI, and panelists were Linda Northrop of the SEI, Doug Schmidt of Vanderbilt University, Ian Gorton of Pacific Northwest National Lab, Robert Schwanke of Siemens Corporate Research, and Jeromy Carriere. Read the post, Reflections in Software Architecture: Presentations by Jeromy Carriere & Ian Gorton.

QoSA is the premier forum for the presentation of new results in the area of software architecture quality. It brings together researchers, practitioners and students who are concerned with software architecture quality in a holistic way. As a working conference QoSA has a strong practical bias, encompassing research papers, industrial reports and invited talks from renowned speakers. The best contribution of the conference will receive the ACM SIGSOFT Distinguished Paper Award. To learn more, see the full press release about QoSA and the award.