Category: Best Practices in Network Security

This post was also authored by Andrew Hoover.

In Cybersecurity Architecture, Part 1: Cyber Resilience and Critical Service, we talked about the importance of identifying and prioritizing critical or high-value services and the assets and data that support them. In this post, we'll introduce our approach for reviewing the security of the architecture of information systems that deliver or support these services. We'll also describe our review's first areas of focus: System Boundary and Boundary Protection.

According to the Verizon 2018 Data Breach Investigations Report, email was an attack vector in 96% of incidents and breaches that involved social actions (manipulation of people as a method of compromise). The report also says an average of 4% of people will fall for any given phish, and the more phishing emails they have clicked, the more likely they are to click again. The mantra of "more user training" may be helping with the phishing problem, but it isn't solving it. In this blog post, I will cover four technical methods for improving an organization's phishing defense. These methods are vendor- and tool-agnostic, don't require a large security team, and are universally applicable for small and large organizations alike.

In our cyber resilience assessments at the CERT Division of the SEI, we often find that organizations struggle with several fundamentals of cybersecurity management. Specifically, organizations have trouble identifying what critical assets need to be protected and then implementing specific cyber architecture controls, such as network segmentation and boundary protection, to protect them. This post will be the first in a series focusing on common weaknesses in organizational cybersecurity architecture. This initial post focuses on the importance of identifying an organization's critical assets and data so it can design a cybersecurity architecture that incorporates controls to protect those systems.

This blog post outlines best practices for establishing an appropriate level of control to mitigate the risks involved in working with outside entities that support your organization's mission. In today's business landscape, organizations often rely on suppliers such as technology vendors, suppliers of raw materials, shared public infrastructure, and other public services. These outside entities are all examples of the supply chain, which is a type of trusted business partner (TBP). However, these outside entities can pose significant security risks.