Archive: 2015-05

This post is the latest installment in a series aimed at helping organizations adopt DevOps.
Some say that DevOps is a method; others say it is a movement, a philosophy, or even a strategy. There are many ways to define DevOps, but everybody agrees on its basic goal: to bring together development and operations to reduce risk, liability, and time-to-market, while increasing operational awareness. Long before DevOps was a word, though, its growth could be tracked in the automation tooling, culture shifts, and iterative development models (such as Agile) that have been emerging since the early 1970s.

The federal government continues to search for better ways to leverage the latest technology trends and increase efficiency of developing and acquiring new products or obtaining services under constrained budgets. DevOps is gaining more traction in many federal organizations, such as U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the General Services Administration (GSA). These and other government agencies face challenges, however, when implementing DevOps with Agile methods and employing DevOps practices in every phase of the project lifecycle, including acquisition, development, testing, and deployment. A common mistake when implementing DevOps is trying to buy a finished product or an automated toolset, rather than considering its methods and the critical elements required for successful adoption within the organization. As described in previous posts on this blog, DevOps is an extension of Agile methods that requires all the knowledge and skills necessary to take a project from inception through sustainment and also contain project stakeholders within a dedicated team.