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Insider Threat Blog

Real-World Work Combating Insider Threats

This post was co-authored by Jonathan Trotman.

In the previous post of our series analyzing and summarizing insider incidents across multiple sectors, we discussed some of the mandates and requirements associated with federal government insider threat programs as well as documented insider threat incidents. In this post, we will discuss information security regulations and insider threat metrics based on Finance and Insurance incidents from our CERT National Insider Threat Center (NITC) Incident Corpus.

The SEI engages with many organizations of various sizes and industries about their resilience. Those responsible for their organization's cybersecurity often tell us that their information technology (IT) and operational technology (OT) are too different to be assessed together. However, not accounting for both technologies could have serious implications to an organization's resilience. In this post I'll say why, and I'll describe the technology-agnostic tools the SEI uses to scope both IT and OT in resilience assessments.

This blog series reviews topics in performing text analytics to support insider threat mitigation. This post presents a procedural framework for operationalizing this capability. It walks through the process of considering text analytics capability through putting it into practice. The blog also enumerates thought questions about whether to acquire a commercial textual analysis solution, repurpose an existing tool, or develop an in-house capability.

The CERT National Insider Threat Center (NITC) Insider Threat Incident Corpus contains over 2,000 incidents, which, as Director Randy Trzeciak writes, acts as the "foundation for our empirical research and analysis." This vast data set shows us that insider incidents impact both the public and private sector, with federal government organizations being no exception. As Carrie Gardner introduced in the previous blog post in this series, federal government organizations fall under the NAICS Codes for the public administration category. Public administration, in this context, refers to a collection of organizations working primarily for the public benefit, including within national security. This blog post will cover insider incidents within federal government, specifically malicious, non-espionage incidents.

As Randy Trzeciak mentioned in the first blog in this series, we are often asked about the commonalities of insider incidents for a particular sector. These questions invariably begin conversations about which sector-specific best practices and controls are best suited to address the common incident patterns faced by these organizations. To better address this question, we decided to update our model for coding industry sectors1, or what classification system we use to organize the organizations in our insider threat database.

Individual organizations spend millions per year complying with information security mandates, which tend to be either too general or too specific. However, organizations focusing solely on compliance miss the opportunity to strengthen their information security culture. This blog post will explain the benefits of information security culture and demonstrate how compliance with information security mandates may prevent organizations from achieving their full information security culture potential.

Hello, I am Randy Trzeciak, Director of the CERT National Insider Threat Center (NITC). I would like to welcome you to the NITC blog series on insider threat incidents within various sectors. In this first post, I (1) describe the purpose of the series and highlight what you can expect to see during the series, and (2) review the NITC insider threat corpus, which is the foundation for our empirical research and analysis. Join us over this nine-part series as we explore in-depth specific issues pertaining to insider threat. We hope you will follow along, and we encourage you to provide feedback about other sectors that we should analyze.

The costs of the steady stream of data breaches and attacks on sensitive and confidential data continue to rise. Organizations are responding by making data protection a critical component of their leadership and governance strategies. The European Union's recent General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) adds layers of complexity to protecting the data of individuals in the EU and European Economic Area. Organizations are struggling to understand GDPR's requirements, much less become compliant. In this series of blog posts, I'll describe how to use the CERT Resilience Management Model (CERT-RMM) to approach GDPR compliance and, more fundamentally, data privacy.