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SEI Blog

The Latest Research in Software Engineering and Cybersecurity

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Analysis: System Architecture Virtual Integration Nets Significant Savings

Analysis: System Architecture Virtual Integration Nets Significant Savings

• SEI Blog
Peter Feiler

The size of aerospace software, as measured in source lines of code (SLOC), has grown rapidly. Airbus and Boeing data show that SLOC have doubled every four years. The current generation of aircraft software exceeds 25 million SLOC (MSLOC). These systems must satisfy safety-critical, embedded, real-time, and security requirements. Consequently, they cost significantly more than general-purpose systems. Their design is more complex, due to quality attribute requirements, high connectivity among subsystems, and sensor dependencies--each of...

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Test Suites as a Source of Training Data for Static Analysis Alert Classifiers

Test Suites as a Source of Training Data for Static Analysis Alert Classifiers

• SEI Blog
Lori Flynn

Numerous tools exists to help detect flaws in code. Some of these are called flaw-finding static analysis (FFSA) tools because they identify flaws by analyzing code without running it. Typical output of an FFSA tool includes a list of alerts for specific lines of code with suspected flaws. This blog post presents our initial work on applying static analysis test suites in a novel way by automatically generating a large amount of labeled data for...

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The Hybrid Threat Modeling Method

The Hybrid Threat Modeling Method

• SEI Blog
Nancy Mead

This blog post is also authored by Forrest Shull. Modern software systems are constantly exposed to attacks from adversaries that, if successful, could prevent a system from functioning as intended or could result in exposure of confidential information. Accounts of credit card theft and other types of security breaches concerning a broad range of cyber-physical systems, transportation systems, self-driving cars, and so on, appear almost daily in the news. Building any public-facing system clearly demands...

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Why Does Software Cost So Much?

Why Does Software Cost So Much?

• SEI Blog
Robert Stoddard

Cost estimation was cited by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) as one of the top two reasons why DoD programs continue to have cost overruns. How can we better estimate and manage the cost of systems that are increasingly software intensive? To contain costs, it is essential to understand the factors that drive costs and which ones can be controlled. Although we understand the relationships between certain factors, we do not yet separate the causal...

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Best Practices and Considerations in Egress Filtering

Best Practices and Considerations in Egress Filtering

• SEI Blog
Rachel Kartch

When considering best practices in egress filtering, it is important to remember that egress filtering is not focused on protecting your network, but rather on protecting other organizations' networks. For example, the May 2017 Wannacry Ransomware attack is believed to have exploited an exposed vulnerability in the server message block (SMB) protocol and was rapidly spread via communications over port 445. Egress and ingress filtering of port 445 would have helped limit the spread of...

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Coordinated Vulnerability Disclosure for DoD Websites

Coordinated Vulnerability Disclosure for DoD Websites

• SEI Blog
Art Manion

Almost 30 years ago, the SEI's CERT Coordination Center established a program that enabled security researchers in the field to report vulnerabilities they found in an organization's software or systems. But this capability did not always include vulnerabilities found on Department of Defense (DoD) sites. In 2017, the SEI helped expand vulnerability reporting to the DoD by establishing the DoD Vulnerability Disclosure program. This blog post, which was adapted from an article in the recently...

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Implications and Mitigation Strategies for the Loss of End-Entity Private Keys

Implications and Mitigation Strategies for the Loss of End-Entity Private Keys

• SEI Blog
Aaron Reffett

This post is co-authored by Thomas Scanlon. When a private key in a public-key infrastructure (PKI) environment is lost or stolen, compromised end-entity certificates can be used to impersonate a principal (a singular and identifiable logical or physical entity, person, machine, server, or device) that is associated with it. An end-entity certificate is one that does not have certification authority to authorize other certificates. Consequently, the scope of a compromise or loss of an end-entity...

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