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The Latest Research in Software Engineering and Cybersecurity

As part of an ongoing effort to keep you informed about the latest work of SEI technologists, I will keep you apprised of SEI-related work that's published each month as SEI technical reports and notes. This post includes a listing of each report, author/s, and links where reports published in March can be accessed on the SEI website. The first report, A Framework for Evaluating Common Operating Environments, is based on a recent SEI blog postingand is an area I'm actively working on at the SEI. As always, we welcome your feedback on our work.

This is a second in a series of posts focusing on Agile software development. In the first post, "What is Agile?" we provided a short overview of the key elements of the Agile approach, and we introduced the Agile Manifesto. One of the guiding principles from the manifesto emphasizes valuing people over developing processes. While the manifesto clearly alludes to the fact that too much focus on process (and not results) can be a bad thing, we introduce the notion here that the other end of the spectrum can also be bad. This blog explores the level of skill that is needed to develop software using Agile (do you need less skill or more?), as well as the importance of maintaining strong competency in a core set of software engineering processes.

If you ask the question, "What is Agile?" you are likely to get lots of different answers. That's because there is no universally accepted formal definition for Agile. To make matters worse, there are ongoing debates over what Agile software development SHOULD mean. That being the case, when answering the question, "What is Agile?" the safest bet is to stick to what people can agree on, and people generally agree on three key elements of Agile. Taken together, these describe the Agile software development method, as well as the software development approach. In this post--the first in a series on Agile--I will explain the foundations of Agile and its use by developers.

Many people today carry handheld computing devices to support their business, entertainment, and social needs in commercial networks. The Department of Defense (DoD) is increasingly interested in having soldiers carry handheld computing devices to support their mission needs in tactical networks. Not surprisingly, however, conventional handheld computing devices (such as iPhone or Android smartphones) for commercial networks differ in significant ways from handheld devices for tactical networks. For example, conventional devices and the software that runs on them do not provide the capabilities and security needed by military devices, nor are they configured to work over DoD tactical networks with severe bandwidth limitations and stringent transmission security requirements. This post describes exploratory research we are conducting at the SEI to (1) create software that allows soldiers to access information on a handheld device and (2) program the software to tailor the information for a given mission or situation.

Malware--generically defined as software designed to access a computer system without the owner's informed consent--is a growing problem for government and commercial organizations. In recent years, research into malware focused on similarity metrics to decide whether two suspected malicious files are similar to one another. Analysts use these metrics to determine whether a suspected malicious file bears any resemblance to already verified malicious files. Using these metrics allows analysts to potentially save time, by identifying opportunities to leverage previous analysis. This post will describe our efforts to develop a technique (known as fuzzy hashing) to help analysts determine whether two pieces of suspected malware are similar.

Malicious software (known as "malware") is increasingly pervasive with a constant influx of new, increasingly complex strains that wreak havoc by exploiting computers or personal and business information stored therein for malicious or criminal purposes. Examples include code that is designed to pilfer personal and digital credentials; plunder sensitive information from government or business enterprises; or interrupt, misdirect, or render inoperable computer hardware and computer-controlled equipment. This post describes our work to create a rapid search capability that allows analysts to quickly analyze a new piece of malware.

Large-scale DoD acquisition programs are increasingly being developed atop reusable software platforms--known as Common Operating Environments (COEs) --that provide applications and end-users with many net-centric capabilities, such as cloud computing or Web 2.0 applications, including data-sharing, interoperability, user-centered design, and collaboration. Selecting an appropriate COE is critical to the success of acquisition programs, yet the processes and methods for evaluating COEs had not been clearly defined. I explain below how the SEI developed a Software Evaluation Framework and applied it to help assess the suitability of COEs for the US Army.

Continuous technological improvement is the hallmark of the hardware industry. In an ideal world--one without budgets or schedules--software would be redesigned and redeveloped from scratch to leverage each such improvement. But applying this process for software is often infeasible--if not impossible--due to economic constraints and competition. This posting discusses our research in applying verification, namely regression verification, to help the migration of real-time embedded systems from single-core to multi-core platforms.