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The Latest Research in Software Engineering and Cybersecurity

This is the second installment of two blog posts highlighting recommended practices for developing safety-critical systems that was originally published on the Cyber Security & Information Systems Information Analysis Center (CSIAC) website. The first postin the series by Peter Feiler, Julien Delange, and Charles Weinstock explored challenges to developing safety critical systems and presented the first three practices:

  1. Use quality attribute scenarios and mission-tread analyses to identify safety-critical requirements.
  2. Specify safety-critical requirements, and prioritize them.
  3. Conduct hazard and static analyses to guide architectural and design decisions.

Software and acquisition professionals often have questions about recommended practices related to modern software development methods, techniques, and tools, such as how to apply agile methods in government acquisition frameworks, systematic verification and validation of safety-critical systems, and operational risk management. In the Department of Defense (DoD), these techniques are just a few of the options available to face the myriad challenges in producing large, secure software-reliant systems on schedule and within budget.

Using the Architecture Analysis & Design Language (AADL) modeling notation early in the development process not only helps the development team detect design errors before implementation, but also supports implementation efforts and produces high-quality code. Our recent blog posts and webinar have shown how AADL can identify potential design errors and help avoid propagating them through the development process, where remediation can require massive re-engineering, delay the schedule, and increase costs.

This post is the first in a series introducing our research into software and system complexity and its impact in avionics.

On July 6, 2013, an Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 airplane flying from Seoul, South Korea, crashed on final approach into San Francisco International airport. While 304 of the 307 passengers and crew members on board survived, almost 200 were injured (10 critically) and three young women died. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) blamed the crash on the pilots, but also said "the complexity of the Boeing 777's auto throttle and auto flight director--two of the plane's key systems for controlling flight--contributed to the accident."

Software and acquisition professionals often have questions about recommended practices related to modern software development methods, techniques, and tools, such as how to apply agile methods in government acquisition frameworks, systematic verification and validation of safety-critical systems, and operational risk management. In the Department of Defense (DoD), these techniques are just a few of the options available to face the myriad challenges in producing large, secure software-reliant systems on schedule and within budget.

Software and acquisition professionals often have questions about recommended practices related to modern software development methods, techniques, and tools, such as how to apply agile methods in government acquisition frameworks, systematic verification and validation of safety-critical systems, and operational risk management. In the Department of Defense (DoD), these techniques are just a few of the options available to face the myriad challenges in producing large, secure software-reliant systems on schedule and within budget.

In 2010, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a 25-point plan to reform IT that called on federal agencies to employ "shorter delivery time frames, an approach consistent with Agile" when developing or acquiring IT. OMB data suggested Agile practices could help federal agencies and other organizations design and acquire software more effectively, but agencies needed to understand the risks involved in adopting these practices.

As part of an ongoing effort to keep you informed about our latest work, I would like to let you know about some recently published SEI technical reports and notes. These reports highlight the latest work of SEI technologists in governing operational resilience, model-driven engineering, software quality, Android app analysis, software architecture, and emerging technologies. This post includes a listing of each report, author(s), and links where the published reports can be accessed on the SEI website.