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DevOps Blog

Technical Guidelines and Practical Advice for DevOps

Development with Docker

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In our last post, DevOps and Docker, I introduced Docker as a tool to develop and deploy software applications in a controlled, isolated, flexible, and highly portable infrastructure. In this post, I am going to show you how easy it is to get started with Docker. I will dive in and demonstrate how to use Docker containers in a common software development environment by launching a database container (MongoDB), a web service container (a Python Bottle app), and configuring them to communicate forming a functional multi-container application. If you haven't learned the basics of Docker yet, you should go ahead and try out their official tutorial here before continuing.

DevOps and Docker

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Docker is quite the buzz in the DevOps community these days, and for good reason. Docker containers provide the tools to develop and deploy software applications in a controlled, isolated, flexible, highly portable infrastructure. Docker offers substantial benefits to scalability, resource efficiency, and resiliency, as we'll demonstrate in this posting and upcoming postings in the DevOps blog.

On the surface, DevOps sounds great. Automation, collaboration, efficiency--all things you want for your team and organization. But where do you begin? DevOps promises high return on investment in exchange for a significant shift in culture, process, and technology. Substantially changing any one of those things in an established organization can feel like a superhuman feat. So, how can you start your organization on the path to DevOps without compromising your existing business goals and trajectories?

Environment parity is the ideal state where the various environments in which code is executed behave equivalently. The lack of environment parity is one of the more frustrating and tenacious aspects of software development. Deployments and development both fall victim to this pitfall too often, reducing stability, predictability, and productivity. When parity is not achieved, environments behave differently, which makes troubleshooting hard and can make collaboration seem impossible. This lack of parity is a burden for too many developers and operational staff. Looking back on almost every problem I have seen in new production deployments, I find it hard to think of one issue that wasn't due in some part to lack of parity. For developers, this pain is felt when integrating and testing code.