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DevOps Blog

Technical Guidelines and Practical Advice for DevOps

By Tim Palko
Senior Member of the Technical Staff
CERT Cyber Security Solutions Directorate

In the realm of DevOps, automation often takes the spotlight, but nothing is more ubiquitous than the monitoring. There is value to increased awareness during each stage of the delivery pipeline. However, perhaps more than any other aspect of DevOps, the act of monitoring raises the question, "Yes, but what do we monitor?" There are numerous aspects of a project you may want to keep an eye on and dozens of tools from which to choose. This blog post explores what DevOps monitoring means and how it can be applied effectively.

By Aaron Volkmann
Senior Research Engineer
CERT Division

The DevOps philosophy prescribes an increase in communication and collaboration between software development and operations teams to realize better outcomes in software development and delivery endeavors. In addition to bringing development and operations closer together, information security teams should be similarly integrated into DevOps-practicing teams. An automated way of performing complete software security assessments during continuous integration (CI) and continuous delivery (CD) does not exist yet, but this blog post describes how we can apply DevOps principles to application security assessments and integrate the results of those activities with CI/CD.

By Aaron Volkmann
Senior Research Engineer
CERT Division

You will be hard pressed to find a DevOps software development shop that doesn't employ Vagrant to provision their local software development environments during their development phase. In this blog post, I introduce a tool called Otto, by Hashicorp, the makers of Vagrant.

By Todd Waits
Project Lead
CERT Division

DevOps principles focus on helping teams and organizations deliver business value as quickly and consistently as possible. While the principles advocate for improving the coordination between development and operational teams, they can be adapted for any number of domains. The key components of DevOps we want to emulate across other domains are:

  • collaboration between project team roles
  • infrastructure as code
  • automation of tasks, processes, and workflows
  • monitoring of applications and infrastructure

In this blog post, I explore how to apply DevOps to the incident response domain. In the same way that advances in methodologies surrounding software development were gleaned from Toyota's manufacturing processes, we can apply lessons learned from DevOps across domains.

Aaron Volkmann
Senior Research Engineer
CERT Division

In response to several corporate scandals, such as Enron, Worldcom, and Tyco, in the early 2000s congress enacted the Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) act. The SOX act requires publicly traded companies to maintain a series of internal controls to assure their financial information is being reported properly to investors. In an IT organization, one of the main tenets of SOX compliance is making sure no single employee can unilaterally deploy a software code change into production. DevOps automation techniques and technologies, such as continuous integration (CI), continuous delivery (CD), and infrastructure as code (IaC), can appear on the surface to throw a shop out of SOX compliance. This blog post examines how DevOps automation can help organizations not only stay compliant, but actually increase their compliance.

DevOps for Contractors

By on in

The challenges of DevOps--a cultural change, learning new technologies, and making a big-picture impact for a software project team--are possibly even more challenging in contract work. In this blog post, I'll expand on some of my past experiences as a contract software developer and discuss, in retrospect, how DevOps could have worked in different scenarios.

Formal documentation (such as source code documentation, system requirements and design documentation, or documentation for various user types) is often completely ignored by development teams; applying DevOps processes and philosophies to documentation can help alleviate this problem. Software documentation tends to fall into several categories: code, requirement, design, system, and user documentation. One reason documentation is often ignored is that standard documentation tools and processes create an obstacle for development teams since the tools and processes do not fit in well with the suite of tools development teams rely on, such as version control, issue trackers, wikis, and source code. As a consequence of this mismatch, slow the velocity of development teams. This blog post explores three primary challenges to documentation--process, documenting source code, and system documentation--and explains how DevOps-based documentation allows all stakeholders to access a common, trusted source of information for project details.

Since beginning our DevOps blog in November, and participating in webinars and conferences, we have received many questions that span the various facets of DevOps, including change management, security, and methodologies. This post will address some of the most frequently asked questions.