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SATURN Blog

SEI Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) News and Updates

Ariadna Font Llitjós, IBM Watson Group; Jonathan Berger, Pivotal Labs; and Jeff Patton, Jeff Patton & Associates
Font Llitjós began this conversation-style panel with a brief review of Design Thinking 101: "Design is not a product designers produce"; "design is a process designers facilitate." Then she introduced IBM's method, which includes four modes of design thinking: Understand, Explore, Make/build/prototype, and Validate/iterate.

Paul Boos, Santeon Group
by Jacob Tate, Mount St. Mary's University

Paul Boos introduced us to a little Japanese in his talk titled "Improving Architectural Refactoring Using Kanban and the Mikado Method." These methods have been employed by such companies as Toyota to drastically increase production speed while tracking progress. But how does this translate from assembly lines to software?

Rick Kazman, University of Hawaii and Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute, and Humberto Cervantes, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa
Design is hard. Architects need insight into types of architectural drivers, guidance on selecting design concepts, and what drives certain design decisions to make good decisions by considering these consciously. Architects also need an approach to negotiate with management and stakeholders better to make these good decisions. In this tutorial session, Kazman and Cervantes presented an updated version of the 2006 Architecture-Driven Design Method 2.0 to address these concerns.

Einar Landre and Jørn Ølmheim, Statoil

by Jacob Tate, Mount St. Mary's University
Einar Landre presented an experience report at the last morning session titled "Systems of Action: A Stack Model for Capability Classification." The subject matter of this presentation delved into the importance of structuring a class of systems that can observe phenomena or processes and then interpret this data and make intelligent decisions.

Michael Keeling, IBM Watson Group
The concept of design as a way of thinking comes from Herbert Simon in 1969. Companies would empathize with the user and work to solve their problems, but this approach had the unintended side effect of focusing too exclusively on the user interface, and there is more to design in software than the user interface. Software architecture is the perspective that holds all the perspectives together: users, business needs, and more.

George Fairbanks, Google
In this experience report, George Fairbanks discusses his recent experiences from assembling large bits of software. He reminds us of how sneakily dependencies become complicated through the analogy of the frog in a gradually heating pot of water. Architects could solve the complexity problem up front in a waterfall process, but how and when can they architecturally intervene in an incremental development process?

Mary Shaw, Carnegie Mellon University

by Jacob Tate, Mount St. Mary's University
The SATURN 2015 Conference is underway, and what a great start! As the largest SATURN Conference to date with over 200 attendees, you can feel the excitement and buzz of the people who traveled from all over the globe to attend. It kicked off yesterday with a few special sessions and classes, but more notably with the introductions and the first keynote speaker this morning. Mary Shaw gave a fast-paced lecture on the progress of engineering in terms of the software discipline. She explored the question "Is software engineering really engineering?" and systematically explained the various definitions of engineering, such as "creating cost-effective solutions to practical problems by applying codified knowledge and building things in the service of mankind."

At SATURN 2015, the software architecture community will put microservices on trial. Here is an abstract of this event, which will take place on Tuesday, April 28, from 5:00 to 6:00 pm:

Microservices architecture has emerged as a widely discussed style of building distributed web and internet systems. Proponents argue that this variant of service-oriented architecture (SOA) is well suited to address the challenges of cloud computing, scalability, increased flexibility, and complexity, among others. But haven’t we seen this all before? Is there really anything new and interesting about microservices architecture? Or is this simply a case of history repeating itself, like the last time service-oriented architectures were all the rage? Microservices architecture is hereby charged with being an attractive nuisance in the first degree. SATURN 2015 has recruited an expert panel of judges to debate the benefits and perils of microservices architecture and help you, the jury, learn the facts and determine the final verdict.