SEI Insights

SATURN Blog

SEI Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) News and Updates

Rebecca Wirfs-Brock, Wirfs-Brock Associates, and Joseph Yoder, The Refactory, Inc.

How do you make quality happen? Budget time for quality discussions and quality testing. During envisioning and requirements gathering, identify core qualities. The core goal of agile and lean was not just to go faster, but to get rid of waste. Quality can be a result of those processes, but you need to engineer for quality by architecting for quality and then testing for it. You'll also need to determine appropriate times when qualities can be tested and delivered.

Len Bass; Sascha Bates, Chef; Sam Newman, ThoughtWorks
by Jacob Tate, Mount St. Mary's University

Len Bass, Sascha Bates, and Sam Newman started off the afternoon session with a presentation titled "DevOps: Essentials for Software Architects." Dr. Bass introduced this session by explaining exactly what the speakers will mean by "DevOps." He stated that after software architects or engineers finish their job, it often takes too long to get their code into production. DevOps is concerned with reducing the time from code completion to code production. Errors in code and miscommunication about which versions of which tools are being used are some of the biggest problems causing the process to be slow. We can speed up deployment by setting up an architecture so that development teams do not have to coordinate with each other; this coordination is where a lot of time is lost.

Matthias Naab, Fraunhofer IESE; Ralf Carbon, John Deere; and Susanne Braun, Fraunhofer IESE

by Jacob Tate, Mount St. Mary's University
Drs. Ralf Carbon and Matthias Naab kicked off the short-presentation afternoon session with their talk titled "Never Again Offline?!? Experiences on the Outstanding Role of Data in a Large-Scale Mobile App Ecosystem." As you might gather from the lengthy title, there was an abundance of information packed into these 30 minutes.

Gloria Ingabire, Carnegie Mellon University

OpenMRS is an existing, robust medical record system (MRS), and Ingabire is proposing some additional functions for it, called OpenMRS+. She was inspired to take on this challenge by her mother's history of diabetes and uncle's history of cardiovascular disease. If people knew the likelihood of getting a non-communicable disease, they might be more likely to take precautions.

Simon Brown, Coding the Architecture

by Jacob Tate, Mount St. Mary's University
Simon Brown taught us a lot in his session titled "Software Architecture as Code." From teaching us where Jersey is to how to extract architecture from code, Brown gave a riveting talk on bridging the gap between architecture and code. Diagrams for software architecture are often messy; one developer cannot distinguish another's way of thinking by looking at sloppy boxes and mismatched lines. Would we write our code this way? Our code does not map to the architectural views we created, and this is a problem.

Forrest Shull, Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI);
Thomas DuBois, The Boeing Company;
Nick Guertin, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation;
Michael McLendon, SEI;
and Douglas C. Schmidt, Vanderbilt University and SEI

Forrest Shull opened the session with a brief introduction to Open Systems Architectures (OSA), an initiative within the DoD, to make systems more configurable and adaptable than they are today. This initiative ties in with the Better Buying Power Initiative, which focuses on making systems more efficient and effective. It's about system architecture, but software architecture is buried within that. How do we make systems more modular, more open, and still deal with interfaces between the components when the systems are part of a community? How much to make open and how much to keep behind the wall are issues that this initiative must deal with. Each panelist gave a brief on their opinions of where OSA stands today and what its challenges are.