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SATURN Blog

SEI Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) News and Updates

Amine Chigani and Yun Freund, GE Software

At GE, software is a horizontal capability in the company, with over 14,000 software professionals in the business. GE Software is launching the Predix™ platform, which will be a common theme across all of GE's industries, and the company will make this platform available to the world later this year.

Jeromy Carriere, Rick Buskens, and Jack Greenfield, Google
Evolving Mission-Critical "Legacy" Systems, Rick Buskens

Buskens's team is a multisite team that works on a suite of projects focused on Google's internal structure, while others are external-facing and cloud. The infrastructure for running services at Google is built on Borg, a cluster-management system that runs hundreds of thousands of jobs across thousands of applications in clusters of tens of thousands of machines. Borg is an internal cloud infrastructure, whose users have many different needs; a service configuration specification called BCL (Borg Configuration Language) allows users to tell Borg what those needs are. Buskens's team works on Borg Config, which interprets the service configuration for Borg; it manages the millions of jobs running each day. BorgCron works for scheduled and repeated tasks at Google scale.

Jane Orsulak and Julie Kent, Raytheon
by Jacob Tate, Mount St. Mary's University

Jane Orsulak and Julie Kent kicked off the experience-presentation session on SATURN's final day by talking about "System Characterization: An Approach to Modernizing Disparate Legacy Systems." In this presentation, they gave a summary of some of the training that soldiers have to go through, such as live training and virtual training.

Rebecca Wirfs-Brock, Wirfs-Brock Associates, and Joseph Yoder, The Refactory, Inc.

How do you make quality happen? Budget time for quality discussions and quality testing. During envisioning and requirements gathering, identify core qualities. The core goal of agile and lean was not just to go faster, but to get rid of waste. Quality can be a result of those processes, but you need to engineer for quality by architecting for quality and then testing for it. You'll also need to determine appropriate times when qualities can be tested and delivered.

Len Bass; Sascha Bates, Chef; Sam Newman, ThoughtWorks
by Jacob Tate, Mount St. Mary's University

Len Bass, Sascha Bates, and Sam Newman started off the afternoon session with a presentation titled "DevOps: Essentials for Software Architects." Dr. Bass introduced this session by explaining exactly what the speakers will mean by "DevOps." He stated that after software architects or engineers finish their job, it often takes too long to get their code into production. DevOps is concerned with reducing the time from code completion to code production. Errors in code and miscommunication about which versions of which tools are being used are some of the biggest problems causing the process to be slow. We can speed up deployment by setting up an architecture so that development teams do not have to coordinate with each other; this coordination is where a lot of time is lost.

Matthias Naab, Fraunhofer IESE; Ralf Carbon, John Deere; and Susanne Braun, Fraunhofer IESE

by Jacob Tate, Mount St. Mary's University
Drs. Ralf Carbon and Matthias Naab kicked off the short-presentation afternoon session with their talk titled "Never Again Offline?!? Experiences on the Outstanding Role of Data in a Large-Scale Mobile App Ecosystem." As you might gather from the lengthy title, there was an abundance of information packed into these 30 minutes.