SEI Insights

SATURN Blog

SEI Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) News and Updates

For the next 48 hours, the updated edition of SATURN 2013 Keynote Speaker Scott Berkun's popular book of essays, Mindfire: Big Ideas for Curious Minds is available for free for download in all ebook editions. This 1.1 edition has more than 100 minor corrections, typo fixes, and little polishes making it the best version ever of this collection of Berkun's writings over the last decade. At SATURN, Berkun will speak at 1:15 pm on Wednesday, May 1 on WordPress.com and the Future of Work. Download Mindfire now.

When a system fails, engineers too often focus on the physical components, but pay scant attention to the software. In software-reliant systems ignoring or deemphasizing the importance of software failures can be a recipe for disaster. This blog post at the SEI Blog�is the first in a series on recent developments with the Architecture Analysis Design Language (AADL) standard. First published in 2004 by SAE International, AADL is a modeling notation that employs both a textual and graphical representation. AADL provides modeling concepts to describe the runtime architecture of application systems in terms of concurrent tasks, their interactions, and their mapping onto an execution platform.

Development organizations use AADL to conduct lightweight, rigorous, yet comparatively inexpensive analyses of critical real-time factors such as performance, dependability, security, and data integrity. Use of AADL helps alleviate mismatched assumptions between the hardware, software, and their interactions that can lead to system failures. This podcast, an interview with Julien Delange and Peter Feiler of the SEI, covers the latest developments in AADL.

SATURN 2013 is only a month and a half away, and the deadline for registering for the reduced early-bird rate is April 1. If you are an experienced or aspiring practitioner or technical consultant and have seen the technical program, list of courses and tutorials, and descriptions of the keynotes and plenary talks, chances are that you found something on the program that would be relevant to your interests and concerns.

But if you still haven't registered to attend SATURN, you probably have good reasons for hesitating. You may be having difficulty convincing the people who approve your travel requests that the benefits you will derive from attending will outweigh the costs of travel, conference fees, and perhaps most importantly, time away from the office-time during which you will not generate any billable hours or be able to contribute to important projects. Why, then, do we think that you should consider registering for SATURN despite your good reasons for hesitating?

If you are a practicing or aspiring software architect, the SEI Software Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) 2013 Conference offers courses, presentations, tutorials, and talks providing technical advice and knowledge around four architectural themes:

  • Front-end architectures: impact of living on the edge
  • Back-end architectures and application hosting: go to the cloud or stay on the ground?
  • Methods and tools: go with the flow or go your own way?
  • Technical leadership: hard skills and soft skills
SATURN 2013 will be held in Minneapolis, Minnesota, April 29 through May 3, 2013. Register for the SATURN software architecture conference before March 10 at� to save $300 off the regular registration fee. SATURN will feature thought-provoking and inspiring keynote and invited talks from leaders in the fields of software architecture and software development:

Date:February 27, 2013

(Part 1)
Time:
1:30 - 3:00 PM ET

Cost: None
Register now.

About the Tutorial
SOA is not an architecture. SOA is not a system. SOA is a way of designing systems, an approach to system development, an architectural style, a design paradigm. As an architectural style, SOA can be described in terms of components and connectors. The main components are the services, service consumers, and SOA infrastructure. The connectors are predominantly message-based document exchanges. In essence, SOA is an architectural style and an approach to software development that goes with the style. You do not "build a SOA," you "build a service-oriented system."

The SEI often works to transition mature technologies and processes to the broad software engineering community, and to accelerate the adoption and impact of software engineering improvements. In that spirit, the SEI has made all of its SOA Migration, Adoption and Reuse Technique (SMART) resources freely available. These resources comprise all the SMART training materials, processes, and artifacts. SMART is a family of techniques created by the SEI to help organizations make better decisions about service-oriented architecture (SOA) adoption. Learn more in this article about SMART on the SEI website. To download the SEI's SMART Family resources, please visit http://www.sei.cmu.edu/architecture/tools/smart/index.cfm.

As the tutorial chair for SATURN 2013, I would like to share with you some of the exciting highlights from our tutorial program this year. You will want to make plans to stay all week. We start off the week with a series of very strong tutorials wrapping up the week Friday with tutorials from two of our featured conference speakers, Mary Poppendieck and Phillipe Kruchten. Our selection of 10 tutorials covers the spectrum of conference topics including software design, backend integration/application hosting, methods and tools, and technical leadership.

The tutorial program starts on Monday afternoon with an introduction to principles and patterns of RESTful web services (T1) and a practical guide to techniques and behaviors that will help you to successfully coach an architecture team (T2). Tuesday begins with an overview of a risk- and cost-driven architecture approach (T3) and a pattern-driven approach to architecture recovery and discovery (T4). Tuesday afternoon we continue with a tutorial on the key concepts of NoSQL databases from an architect's perspective (T5) and a simple approach for developing software architecture diagrams (sketches) given by Simon Brown (T6).