SEI Insights

CERT/CC Blog

Vulnerability Insights

Hi folks, it's Will Dormann. A few months ago I published a blog entry called Don't Sign that Applet! that outlined some concerns with Oracle's guidance that all Java applets should be signed. The problem is that with Java versions prior to 7u25, there is nothing that prevents a signed applet from being repurposed by an attacker to execute with full privileges. As it turns out, Java 7u25 introduced features to prevent a Java applet from being repurposed. Thanks to CERT/CC blog reader Rob Whelan for pointing this out! There are some potential pitfalls when using this feature, however.

Hi, this is Vijay Sarvepalli, Security Solutions Engineer in the CERT Division again. In my earlier blog post, I offered some ideas for applying set theory in your SOC (Security Operations Center). This time I introduce you to statistics, specifically standard deviation. Mathematical terms such as standard deviation can seem mysterious for daily security operations. However, I've provided some simple examples to help you analyze network security data using this measurement.

Hello, Jonathan Foote here. In this post I'll explain how to use information from databases in stock Ubuntu systems to gather the parameters needed to perform corpus distillation (gathering of seed inputs) and fuzzing against the installed default file type handlers in Ubuntu Desktop 12.04. This technique applies to most modern versions of Ubuntu.

Hello, this is Jonathan Spring. I've been investigating the usage of domains that are typos of other domains. For example, foogle.com is a typo of google.com, and it's a common one since 'f' is next to 'g' on the standard keyboard. The existing hypothesis has been that typo domains would be used for malicious purposes. Users would commonly mistype the domain they are going to, and some of the less scrupulous domain owners could take advantage of this to trick them or infect their computers.