SEI Insights

CERT/CC Blog

Vulnerability Insights

Hi, this is Vijay Sarvepalli, security solutions engineer in the CERT Division again. In the earlier blog entries for this series, I introduced set theory and standard deviation. This blog entry is about entropy, a physics principle that has made its way into many mathematical applications. Entropy has been applied in many informational science topics. In this blog post, I introduce a way to use entropy to detect anomalies in network communications patterns.

Hacking the CERT FOE

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Hey folks, it's Will. Every now and then I encounter an app that doesn't play well with FOE. You don't have to throw your hands up in defeat, though. Because FOE (and BFF) are written in Python, it's pretty easy to modify them to do what you like.

Hi, this is Jose Morales, researcher in the CERT:CES team. In early 2012, a backdoor Trojan malware named Flame was discovered in the wild. When fully deployed, Flame proved very hard for malware researchers to analyze. In December of that year, Wired magazine reported that before Flame had been unleashed, samples of the malware had been lurking, undiscovered, in repositories for at least two years. As Wired also reported, this was not an isolated event.

Hi, Timur Snoke here with a description of maps I've developed that use Border Gateway Protocol routing tables to show the evolution of public-facing autonomous system numbers.

Organizations that route public internet protocol (IP) addresses receive autonomous system numbers (ASNs), which uniquely identify networks on the Internet. To coordinate traffic between ASNs, the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) advertises available routing paths that network traffic could take to access other IP addresses. BGP tables select and advertise the best routes for network traffic. Consequently, BGP data often provide better insight into traffic ownership than the physical or the logical layer. This blog post describes maps that I have developed that use BGP routing tables to represent the evolution of public-facing ASNs.

Hi, it's Timur Snoke of the CERT NetSA group, posting on behalf of Deana Shick and Angela Horneman. It's not every day that 9.6 terabytes of data is released into the public domain for further research. The Internet Census 2012 project scanned the entire IPv4 address space using the Nmap Scripting Engine(NSE) between March and December of 2012. The engineer of this data set (identity unknown) saved and released the collected data in early 2013. The data is broken down into seven types of scan results: ICMP ping, reverse DNS, service probes, host probes, syncscan queries, TCP/IP fingerprints, and traceroute.

Hi folks, Allen Householder here. As Will Dormann's earlier post mentioned, we have recently released the CERT Basic Fuzzing Framework (BFF) v2.7 and the CERT Failure Observation Engine (FOE) v2.1. To me, one of the most interesting additions was the crash recycling feature. In this post, I will take a closer look at this feature and explain why I think it's so interesting.