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CERT/CC Blog

Vulnerability Insights

Hi, it's Allen. In addition to building fuzzers to find vulnerabilities (and thinking about adding some concurrency features to BFF in the process), I've been doing some work in the area of cybersecurity information sharing and the ways it can succeed or fail. In both my vulnerability discovery and cybersecurity information sharing work, I've found that I often learn the most by examining the failures -- in part because the successes are often just cases that could have failed, but didn't.

In this blog post I focus on an area of cybersecurity information sharing that's considerably less well understood than incident reporting, malware analysis, or indicator sharing. I'm talking about coordinated vulnerability disclosure and why it's hard.

Hello, this is Jonathan Spring with my colleague Leigh Metcalf. Today, we're releasing a CERT/CC whitepaper on our investigations into domain name parking. The title summarizes our findings neatly: "Domain Parking: Not as Malicious as Expected."

First, let's review some definitions to make sure we're all on the same page. Domain parking is the practice of assigning a nonsense location to a domain when it is not in use to keep it ready for "live" use. When a domain is "parked" on an IP address, the IP address to which the domain resolves is inactive or otherwise not controlled by the same entity that controls the domain.

Hi folks, Allen Householder here. I want to introduce some recent work we're undertaking to look at vulnerability discovery for emerging networked systems (including cyberphysical systems like home automation, networked cars, industrial control systems and the like). In this post I cover the background and motivation for this work, our approach, and some preliminary findings. In future posts I will cover additional results from this effort.

Hi, this is Angela Horneman from the CERT Situational Awareness Analysis team. Recently, Nathan Dell and I were asked to explore ways to improve network traffic data storage by determining what data to store to meet organizational needs. Our research, brainstorming, and discussions led us to create a methodology to help organizations determine what types of traffic to collect and what parts of the collected traffic to keep.

Hi, this is Leigh Metcalf. In this blog post I talk about a subversive use of SiLK, the open-source tool suite designed by the CERT/CC team at the SEI, available on the CERT website. This post is a technical walk through of how to use the SiLK tools to support analysis in interesting ways you may not have thought of.