Archive: 2016-06

Application whitelisting is a useful defense against users running unapproved applications. Whether you're dealing with a malicious executable file that slips through email defenses, or you have a user that is attempting to run an application that your organization has not approved for use, application whitelisting can help prevent those activities from succeeding.

Some enterprises may deploy application whitelisting with the idea that it prevents malicious code from executing. But not all malicious code arrives in the form of a single executable application file. Many configurations of application whitelisting do not prevent malicious code from executing, though. In this blog post I explain how this is possible.

Recently, there has been a resurgence of malware that is spread via Microsoft Word macro capabilities. In 1999, CERT actually published an advisory about the Melissa virus, which leveraged macros to spread. We even published an FAQ about the Melissa virus that suggests to disable macros in Microsoft Office products.

Why is everything old new again? Reliability of the exploit is one reason, but the user interface of Microsoft Office is also to blame.