Archive: 2013-10

Hi, Timur Snoke here with a description of maps I've developed that use Border Gateway Protocol routing tables to show the evolution of public-facing autonomous system numbers.

Organizations that route public internet protocol (IP) addresses receive autonomous system numbers (ASNs), which uniquely identify networks on the Internet. To coordinate traffic between ASNs, the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) advertises available routing paths that network traffic could take to access other IP addresses. BGP tables select and advertise the best routes for network traffic. Consequently, BGP data often provide better insight into traffic ownership than the physical or the logical layer. This blog post describes maps that I have developed that use BGP routing tables to represent the evolution of public-facing ASNs.

Hi, it's Timur Snoke of the CERT NetSA group, posting on behalf of Deana Shick and Angela Horneman. It's not every day that 9.6 terabytes of data is released into the public domain for further research. The Internet Census 2012 project scanned the entire IPv4 address space using the Nmap Scripting Engine(NSE) between March and December of 2012. The engineer of this data set (identity unknown) saved and released the collected data in early 2013. The data is broken down into seven types of scan results: ICMP ping, reverse DNS, service probes, host probes, syncscan queries, TCP/IP fingerprints, and traceroute.